TMEA All-State Band Etudes for 2018-2019

This is the official listing of the Band Division All-State Audition Material. All amendments, corrections and errata will become official only when it is published here.

The TMEA All-State Performance Guides are provided as a tool to help you. Be sure to make note of any changes that may appear here during the upcoming months. Errata will not be posted in the Southwestern Musician magazine. Should you discover any errata in the music that may have been missed, please notify the State Band Division Chair, John Carroll.


Flute and Piccolo

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Mary Karen Clardy Flute Etudes Book European American Music Corp. or Schott EA 764 0-913574-96-1

Selection 1

Page(s): 18-19
Key: D Major
Etude Title: Op. 26 / 21
Tempo: Dotted quarter note 56-76
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Piccolo: 
M. 9, Change the 5th and 6th notes of the bar to A and C# in the staff. The notes will now read as F#-C#-A-F#-A-C#. The second beat will be played as printed.
Beginning in the 2nd beat of m. 16, play up an octave through the end of m. 22. (Posted 8/6)

Performance Guide:
In preparation for this etude, students should practice D Major and A Major scales and arpeggios as well as double and triple tonguing exercises. The staccato marks should be interpreted as light rather than very short, dry notes. The tone needs to be vibrant and singing throughout the etude.

In order to achieve an even sound between the slurred and articulated notes, the air speed needs to remain very fast at all times and strong support is important.

Breathing will be a challenge. Differentiate between the cadentail breaths (mm. 34, 38, 50, 54) where extra time can be taken and breaths that should remain as close to in tempo as possible.

It will also be helpful to observe the purpose of slurs, to show the notes that require emphasis. Make sure you sing through these notes. Large intervals, particularly those at the end of the etude, require more time to sound clearly.


Terms: Presto - fast.

Selection 2

Page(s): 48
Key: D# Minor
Etude Title: Op. 33 / 14
Tempo: Quarter note 52-56
Play from Beginning to end - No Repeats.
Errata:
m. 13 - add a slur from the grace note to the following note
m. 21 - last triplet should be slurred as in m. 5

Performance Guide:
This beautiful etude should be performed with your most expressive tone, skillfully employing vibrato to aid in the richness of sound and direction of phrases, always moving towards cadences.

I strongly encourage you to think of this etude in sharps, not to rewrite it in flats as that will confuse many of the accidental markings. Practice your F# Major scale as well as D# Harmonic Minor to help the fingering patterns feel familiar. The double-sharp marking might be new to many students. It is printed as a small x and indicates you should add two sharps to the note. For example, in measure 3 the C has a double-sharp, so it is raised twice, to a C# then again to a D-natural.

Follow the printed dynamic scheme, taking note of the hairpins in most phrases where the crescendo leads to the peak of the phrase and the decrescendo comes away from it. This follows the natural shape of the line and should direct not only your dynamics, but also your vibrato.

The phrases are long and it is acceptable to breathe in the middle of them if needed. Take care that the phrases within a breath do not stop the forward motion. This can be achieved by matching the tone quality, dynamic level, and vibrato speed immediately before and after a breath.

The small cadenza in m. 22 can be played freely with rubato. I recommend a breath after the high F#, then don’t breathe again until after the half-note in m. 24.

Selection 3

Page(s): 38
Key: B Major
Etude Title: Op. 107 / 21
Tempo: Quarter note 148-176
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
no repeat
Piccolo: m. 34; take the C-sharp up one octave

Performance Guide:
This playful etude should be performed with a light-hearted character and speed should never overshadow style. In order to bring out the character, exaggerate all the dynamics and keep the articulation light and bouncy, not extremely short.

When first learning this etude count in quarter notes for perfect accuracy with the complicated rhythms. Pay particular attention to measures 9-11 as these are commonly performed incorrectly. As you gain familiarity with the etude, transition to feeling it in 1 as would be appropriate for a waltz. The B major scale and arpeggio should also be practiced consistently.

For many of the triplet 16th notes trill fingerings can be used to aid in fluidity. Note that in the staff C#-D# should be played using the 2nd trill key. The C#-D# above the staff should be played using the 1st and 2nd trill keys. On the downbeat of m. 36, if you have a C# trill key use it for the high F#-G# triplet. For flutes without a C# trill key, finger the high F#, then trill your lift hand first finger and thumb simultaneously. Ensure that the 16th note triplets happen on the beat, not before.

For the most part breaths can be taken in the rests. Additional breaths will most likely be needed at the ends of measures 12, 33, and 35.

I strongly encourage you to think of this etude in sharps, not to rewrite it in flats as that will confuse many of the accidental markings. The double-sharp marking might be new to many students. It is printed as a small x and indicates you should add two sharps to the note. For example, in measure 3 the C has a double-sharp, so it is raised twice, to a C# then again to a D-natural. The notes in m. 3 will be fingered as F#, D-natural, A#, F#, D-natural.

Terms:
In tempo de Walzer- Waltz tempo
Grazioso- Graceful
Morbido- Softly
Scherzo- Joking


Soprano Clarinets

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
David Hite Artistic Studies, Book 1 - From the French School Southern Music Company B362

Selection 1

Page(s): 54
Key: E Minor
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 8
Tempo: Quarter note 88-108
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Do not play the repeat from measures 16 through 31.

Performance Guide:
This minor etude is marked con spirito e deciso, so let that mood guide the tongue one-slur three articulation which is prevalent. Do not let the staccato note become too heavy and the slurred notes become softer – keep them dynamically even throughout so you can concentrate on the larger phrase.

At m. 10 make the most of the quick contrasts and then think about the large phrase beginning the last beat of m. 12. At m. 16 do not take the repeat. Notice the articulation pattern changes. Emphasize the accents beginning in m. 23 and pay special attention to m.28 – crescendo through those accents.

In m. 32 the tonality changes to G Major and there are octave slurs to navigate. Excellent finger and thumb coordination is required in mm. 35 through 45. Be sure the left hand thumb is not late, otherwise a low grunt or undertone may be produced. Stress the low notes during the octaves in mm 35, 36, 39 and 40, for evenness of technique and direction of the melodic line.

Notice the tonality change to E Major in m.47, and make sure to use chromatic B-natural in m.51 and a right pinky B in m. 54 to follow a R-L-R pinky pattern for the B-C#-D#. The tonality of E minor returns in m. 67 with a left pinky slide between the B and the C#. Emphasize the forte in m. 75-76, piano in m. 77-78 as the phrase repeats down the octave, and then play the surprise forte last note with a full but controlled sound.


Selection 2

Page(s): 59
Key: D Major
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 13
Tempo: Quarter note 54-63
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Measure 21 - the second note in the measure - the E - should be a 32nd note instead of a 16th note.
Measure 36 - Articulate sixteenth triplets as notated in measures 37 & 38.

Performance Guide:
This etude provides a way to display beautiful sound, expressive playing and musicality while demonstrating rhythmic precision. Reference the glossary at the back of the book for the many expressive markings and descriptions that should be observed for correct style and musical approach.

Subdivision is key to smooth and even playing while changing from sixteenths, triplet sixteenths, to thirty-second notes. Although the work is in a slow three, practice using a subdivided beat. This will help place the thirty-second notes in the correct position. Gradually increase the metronome speed until you reach your goal, constantly checking for rhythmic accuracy.

In m. 13 play the first F-sharp with the chromatic fingering and then flip from index to middle finger from E-sharp to F-sharp to get the smoothest sound. Do not be lazy on the rhythm in m. 17 – play the thirty-second notes and don’t turn them into sixteenth notes. In m. 25 there is a dramatic mood change going into B minor, so make the most of the contrasting dynamics in the following 8 measures. An embellished form of the original theme returns in m. 33, so make sure the theme is emphasized more than the embellishments. Beginning at m. 41, it is important to maintain a beautiful sound, play with fast air, and keep the energy going through the end of the phrase. Don’t get too soft too soon in m. 56. In m. 61 let each note get softer until the final high D in m. 62.

Make sure to use rubato throughout to create a musically satisfying performance. Be convincing in your phrase shapes and add nuances where the expressive markings suggest.

Selection 3

Page(s): 88-89
Key:
Etude Title: 9 Caprices, 6
Tempo: Dotted quarter note 58-68
Play from Beginning to 79.
Errata:
This Etude is numbered wrong by the Publisher. If you start numbering with ZERO you will have the correct numbering.
Add a crescendo in m.21 and a diminuendo in m.22-24.
Add a ritard in m. 30. A Tempo in m.32.
Change the fp in m.73 to a piano.

Performance Guide:
This etude utilizes wide leaps, sequences, arpeggios and thirds, accents, and different articulations to create an exciting musical atmosphere. Strive for long musical lines and listen for subtle changes in the harmonies.

Begin at a full forte and watch the accents in m.2-6. The piano in m. 7 is important so the long crescendo can be observed in m. 9-13. Keep strong air support at all dynamics in the low playing in m. 16-24, including the diminuendo in m.22-24. End this first section with a full, focused sound, and add a ritard in m.30 going to the final note of the phrase in m. 31. Return to a tempo in m.32.

The second section returns to the wide leaps, so make sure the sound does not scoop when articulating these notes. Use your left pinky for the low F in m. 37 to avoid sliding. From 47 to 64 the phrases are long with subtle harmonic changes. Think of this in these phrases: m. 47-54, 55-59, and 60-64. Add crescendos and diminuendos in these phrases to keep the intensity all the way through this line. Use a left pinky for the C in m.50,56, and 64. Start m. 65 very softly and build to m.69, keeping the energy in the repeated measures in m. 69-71.

The final long phrase begins in m. 73 -- change the fp to a piano and build every two measures to arrive at the forte in m.79.






Low Clarinets

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
David Hite Artistic Studies, Book 1 - From the French School Southern Music Company B362

Selection 1

Page(s): 62
Key: D Major
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 17
Tempo: Quarter note 84-100
Play from beg to end.
Errata:
m. 29: slur 3rd through 5th 16th notes (as in m. 1)
m. 43: 5th note should be C#
m. 14 going to m. 15: change slur to match m. 30 going to m. 31
Contras play down an octave beginning on beat 2 in m38 through m40, and mm54 and 55.

Performance Guide:
Generally, when you have a slurred group followed by one or more staccato notes, you should think of slightly stressing or lengthening the first slurred note. Then, lightly clip the last slurred note. This will prevent the slurred group from feeling rushed and will also set up the style of the staccato group that follows.

Remember to practice slowly in the beginning with a metronome, subdividing the eight note for rhythmic and technical accuracy before increasing the speed. Carefully mark and observe fingering choices for smoothness and clarity of technique. Use right pinky B natural in mm 1,8,13,18,33 and 35. Use left pinky B natural when preceded, or followed, by C#, throughout this etude. Examples are mm 2,14,16,23,26,30,41 and 54.

Place the grace notes before the beat in mm 2,14,18,22,26,30 and 49. In general, place the grace notes before the beat when they occur at the end of the half note trills, such as mm 4,10,12 and 28.

The student will find the "fingers ahead" technique to be useful in coordination of the tongue and fingers. As the staccato technique is practiced very slowly, move the finger immediately to the next note. This must be done deliberately and with a metronome. The tongue may be used to define the end of staccato notes if done with care and lightness.

Follow the shape and horizontal direction of the melodic line, with attention to the length of the tied notes across the bar line and across the beat.

Selection 2

Page(s): 49
Key:
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 3
Tempo: Quarter note 50-60
Play from Beginning to first note of M. 37.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
This beautiful etude is intended to showcase tone production as well as musical abilities. Strive for a full and characteristic tone by maintaining a fast air stream. Take care to follow the dynamics and carefully craft the phrases. Also, be sure to plan breathing to compliment your musical ideas.

The work incorporates a variety of rhythms. Practice with a metronome using a subdivided beat, especially in the measures with thirty-second notes to ensure rhythmic accuracy. Once the rhythmic elements feel comfortable, try performing the etude using a slow four pulse. This large beat emphasis gives the etude direction and helps produce the graceful style. Regardless of tempo, the thirty-second notes should sound easy and controlled.

The etude requires the use of many pinkie keys. Be sure to work out the fingering patterns and avoid sliding between pinkie keys. For example, try to incorporate left hand B and right hand C-sharp in beat two of m. 15; do not slide from left hand B to left hand C-sharp.

Selection 3

Page(s): 52
Key: G Major
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 6
Tempo: Quarter note 80-100
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Take NO repeats

M. 33, slur C# to D sixteenth notes to match m. 2. (Posted 8/7).

Performance Guide:
This is a challenging etude for many reasons, primarily technique. Practice the etude with a metronome at various tempos, employing as many practice methods as possible. Start slow with a metronome and gradually increase the tempo. Work toward even finger control and correct articulation.

Pay close attention to the changing articulation patterns from the first day. Relearning an articulation is frustrating and time consuming. The articulation should be well defined while sustaining a good tone quality. Staccato does not imply short but separated or detached. At slower tempi, the staccato length will be longer. Keep the tongue action light and try to eliminate any thud or tongue “noise.”

Creating an appropriate style for this etude is also challenging. The energetic style requires a fast and consistent air stream, which will also help produce smooth finger technique. Be sure to lean on the beginnings of slurs to bring out the implied syncopation and help maintain the intensity. Strive to produce an exciting performance of the etude.


Oboe and English Horn

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
H. Voxman Selected Studies for Oboe Rubank No. 107 HLO4470710

Selection 1

Page(s): 46
Key: Bb Minor
Etude Title: Allegretto
Tempo: Dotted Half Note = 60-70
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
none

Performance Guide:
Music is about motion. There is rhythmic motion as well as melodic motion. Melodic motion (phrasing) is performed by following the up and down flow of the notes on the staff. In order to have a successful performance, we need a complete performance of melody and rhythm. This selection is a lot like a roller coaster ride. Lots of ups and downs and curves. Stay in control. Do not let it sound frantic. Learn it in 3 then move into 1. Articulation needs to be very light and effortless. Do not tongue too hard. The accents are more about space and lean than heavy tongue. The accents help to outline the phrasing. Play the melody not shapeless notes. Drill slowly for key signature and accidentals. Map out your finger patterns. It is easy to get “trapped” in the wrong finger pattern.

Selection 2

Page(s): 12
Key: E Minor
Etude Title: Andante
Tempo: Eighth note 68-76
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
M. 36 should begin with a 32nd rest, rather than  a 16th rest.  (Posted 9/1)
In M. 66, each rest should be a 32nd rest, rather than a 16th rest. (Posted 9/1)
In M. 67, the rest should be a 32nd rest, rather than an 8th rest. (Posted 9/1)

Performance Guide:
Music is about motion. There is rhythmic motion as well as melodic motion. When playing a fast/lyrical melody the faster rhythmic movement has an innate excitement built in due to the faster tempo. When playing a slow/lyrical melody we have to work harder at creating musical movement. Sustained notes can easily be lifeless. We use phrasing, dynamics and vibrato as shaping tools. This selection is hauntingly beautiful. Work out the rhythms carefully. Follow the flow of the notes on the staff for phrase/dynamic shaping. Travel through the long notes with all of your shaping tools. Lean into the accented notes. Do not tongue hard. Do not rush through the notes in the turns. Make sure every note is heard clearly. The notes that are followed by a rest need to touch the rest. Think of this as a hauntingly beautiful moment that is very in sync with the melody and rhythmic pulse.

Selection 3

Page(s): 18
Key: G Minor
Etude Title: Allegro
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 72-80
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Music is about motion. There is rhythmic motion as well as melodic motion. This selection is light and fun. The melodic movement is very playful. We want a complete performance of melodic motion and steady rhythmic motion. Follow the flow of the notes on the staff. Articulation needs to be very light and effortless. Do not tongue too hard. The accents are more about space and lean than heavy tongue. The accents help to outline the phrasing. The notes that are followed by a rest need to touch the rest. Do not play everything loud. Find the melody and outline it with phrasing and dynamics. Phrasing and dynamics tend to go hand in hand. Learn the notes then turn them into music.


Bassoon

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Weissenborn / Ambrosio Practical Method for the Bassoon - 50 Advanced Studies Carl Fischer O2150 0-8258-0350-0

Selection 1

Page(s): 112
Key:
Etude Title: Fifty Advanced Studies, No. 41
Tempo: Quarter note 144-160
Play from Beginning to end, no repeat (da capo and end at mm. 16 at the double bar).
Errata:
mm. 19-20 - place a crescendo and decrescendo across the barline, as in mm. 21-22

Performance Guide:
Your ultimate goal, regardless of tempo, is to feel this etude in 1 rather than 3. Make it dance! Place a small lift after each dotted eighth, and avoid letting the dotted eighth-sixteenth rhythm sound like a triplet. Do not, however, lift as much (if at all) after the accents mm. 39-40.

Make the extreme dynamic contrast in the middle tranquillo section clear, with very smooth slurs and phrase shapes. Don’t let the dotted rhythms interfere with long lines. This etude offers a good example of how to apply the “when music ascends, get louder - when music descends, get softer” rule as a starting place.

Accurate switching between triplet and duplet rhythms is essential. Count and/or sing the rhythms in this etude while conducting with a metronome BEFORE playing so that you have a clear idea of how they should sound. Record yourself counting and/or singing (once it’s accurate) and then play along with the recording.

Right-hand pinky G-flat 3 is a must in many sections of this etude. High B-flat may slur more easily by lifting the right-hand first finger; keep in mind this may raise the pitch and make the tone a bit brighter and less full.

Selection 2

Page(s): 117
Key:
Etude Title: Fifty Advanced Studies, No. 45
Tempo: Dotted quarter note 46-60
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Measure numbers begin with the first full bar.

Take the dolorosamente to heart as you plan the phrasing in this etude, and keep the tempo moving with a touch of rubato as the phrasing allows. Subdivide ties and longer notes carefully. Aim for a warm, singing tone in the tenor register without biting on the reed. Use vibrato as you’re able and vary it according to the phrase’s requirements; avoid vibrato pulses in any semblance of subdivision within the chosen tempo (i.e. triplets or sextuplets).

I tend to prefer this etude on the slower side of Larghetto (quasi-Largo, in fact), but it can still be very effective at the faster end of the tempo range.

Experiment with right-hand pinky G-flat 3 and right-hand thumb A-flat to avoid awkward finger jumps or slides. In mm. 18, lifting the left-hand first finger completely on the G-flat instead of the usual half-hole may facilitate the downward slur, but it may require different voicing to maintain proper pitch and tone.

Selection 3

Page(s): 96
Key: D Minor
Etude Title: Fifty Advanced Studies, No. 22
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 100-110
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
mm. 8 - place a caesura under the fermata, as in mm. 24

mm. 36 - place a poco ritardando on the last 2 beats

Performance Guide:
Keep staccatos light and equal length with full body, regardless of dynamic level or register, and give the accents in the opening figures a gentle push with your air. Do not articulate these accented notes any harsher than the staccatos. Practice all staccatos notes legato to stabilize pitch and tone, and listen for the same quality of sound when playing short. Think about playing into the “center of your sound” for each note.

Use the dynamic contrasts to help you conserve air at whatever your chosen tempo. The printed dynamics are accurate, but you need to add your own phrasing ideas within those guidelines. Every note must have a purpose!

Watch rhythmic integrity of dotted notes & ties; practice with a legato articulation on the subdivisions to “hear” them while you’re playing the long notes.

Practice each large leap slowly, with a tuner, focusing on minimal embouchure adjustment, slight voicing changes, smooth fingers, and continuous air. Play the final D minor arpeggiated figure with a D drone to help intonation.


Contra Bassoon

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Weissenborn / Ambrosio Practical Method for the Bassoon - 50 Advanced Studies Carl Fischer O2150 0-8258-0350-0

Selection 1

Page(s): 83
Key:
Etude Title: Fifty Advanced Studies, No. 6
Tempo: Quarter Note = 100-112
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
The staccato note at the end of the 2-note slurs should be softer and lifted but still have life and body; do not clip these notes too short. Maintain a clear melodic line, connecting the first of every 2-note slur to form the musical idea. Listen for tonal clarity in every staccato note.

Breathing in mm.17-40 can be challenging on the contrabassoon, so place a slight ritardando before you take a quick breath and aim for minimal phrase disruption. 8 measures per breath, minimum, is a good goal.

G3 may or may not require the first octave key. In the final measure, the low C and D keys may be held down during C3 to facilitate the downward slur. Notes in the staff are sometimes improved by using the low D key as a quasi-whisper key. As every contrabassoon is a bit different, be willing to experiment with various fingering combinations. A good starting place is the International Double Reed Society’s website located at www.idrs.org.


Saxophones

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
W. Ferling, Revised by Andraud 48 Famous Studies for Oboe or Saxophone Southern Music Company B103

Selection 1

Page(s): 2
Key:
Etude Title: No. 4
Tempo: Quarter Note = 116-132
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
This etude is written in the style of a toccata and is meant to be fast and flashy. Start by practicing full range scales and arpeggios in the following keys: A minor, E major, plus your A diminished 7th arpeggio. I would suggest that the performer incorporate a single tongue study into their daily practice routine. A good single tonguing study that covers the range of the instrument can be found on page 22 of the Langenus book 3. Be sure not to crush the first two 16th notes of each note grouping. The large leaps written in this etude can present quite a challenge to the performer such as in m10 and m12. Approach these measures by practicing them multiple different ways at a very slow tempo every day. Start by practicing these measures slurred at a very slow tempo, increasing the metronome 1 or 2 bpm at a time. Another way to practice these measures would be to turn the bottom notes into dotted 8ths and the top notes into 16ths (you can easily flip this rhythm around and practice it that way too). If needed, you can breathe after the staccato E on beat one in m13.

Selection 2

Page(s): 13
Key:
Etude Title: No. 25
Tempo: Eighth note 84-96
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
m4 - The sixteenth note at the end of the measure should have a staccato marking.

Performance Guide:
This is a gorgeous etude written in a bel canto (beautiful singing) style. You must maintain control of your air and breathing to sustain the long legato phrases. Practice long tones at very slow tempos (Q=65 and below) throughout the range of the instrument to help build endurance. Along with long tones, be sure to add a vibrato exercise to your daily warm-up. Practice your vibrato with a metronome at varying tempos in triplets, quintuplets, and sextuplets throughout the range of the instrument. Doing this will help you control the speed and width of your vibrato. I also suggest listening to professional string players or vocalists (especially 18th century Italian opera) and try to mimic their vibrato and incorporate it in this etude. Common mistakes made on this etude are usually rhythmic in nature due to trying to play too rubato or adding in ornaments too soon. Start by learning this etude with a metronome without any ornaments or tempo variances. When adding ornaments, make sure they sound stylistically appropriate. Start the half note trills slowly and speed them up through the duration of the note. Grace notes should be played slightly before the beat. The staccatos in m6 and m8 should be tongued with a legato articulation. All other staccatos should be spaced but not short. Make sure to use a wide range of dynamics, however don't play so soft it sacrifices tone quality. If you need to, you can add in breath marks after the G on the upbeat of 1 in m9, the beat 3 E-flat in m11, and after the low B in m16. Taper notes before breaths. Remember to record yourself often and listen to it.

Selection 3

Page(s): 18
Key: F Minor
Etude Title: No. 36
Tempo: Dotted quarter note 76-84
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Start by practicing your F minor scales and arpeggios as well as your diminished 7th arpeggios to help you in learning this etude. Pay close attention to the key signature and the accidentals in each measure. The etude should stay smooth and flowing throughout. The performer must be careful to not clip the top note of each arpeggiated slurred passage. To help with this, make sure to keep your air constant and use a light “du” syllable on the tip of the reed when tonguing the lower note. Since the majority of this etude is slurred, it will be easy to rush. Always practice with a metronome. Practice the slurred passages tongued to ensure evenness of fingers. I find the most challenging measures are m29 and m30 especially when played up to tempo. Practice these measures slowly in eighths, triplets, sixteenths, and quintuplets to help with the technique. The E-flat grace notes found in the first and second measure can be played using just the 3rd palm key. In mm21-23 you can leave your A-flat key down for the entirety of those three measures. If needed, you can breath after the F-sharp on beat 1 of m13.


Cornet/Trumpet

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
H. Voxman Selected Studies Rubank / Hal Leonard No. 108 HLO4470680

Selection 1

Page(s): 39
Key: C# Minor
Etude Title: C# Minor - allegro amoroso
Tempo: Quarter Note = 80-104
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
m. 19, the second note of the second 16th note triplet should be F#
m. 23, the second note of the second 16th note triplet should be F#
m. 25, the last note of the measure is an F# (not an F double sharp)--(Posted 8/27)
m. 27, the last note of the measure is an F# (not an F double sharp) (Posted 8/27)
m. 25 has an E natural on the upbeat of count 2. M. 27 has an E# on the upbeat of count 2. These two measures--25 and 27--are printed correctly--they should not be identical measures (Posted 8/27)
M. 41, upbeat of 2, ignore the staccato markings. The triplet should be slurred. (Posted 8/31)


Performance Guide:
This etude by Gatti requires fast and agile fingers, a precise but light approach to articulation, and a keen awareness of dynamics. The player should be careful to select a tempo that ensures that the dotted sixteenth-thirty second rhythms in mm. 6, 7, etc. can be played cleanly without being rushed or forced. Eighth notes that are both preceded and followed by sixteenth note triplets (mm. 1,3,5, etc.) should be played staccato in order to facilitate clarity of sound and to allow the sixteenth note triplets to be played with ease. When going from one extreme dynamic to the other, like in measure 18, be careful to control the sound and not let the intonation fluctuate. The player may want to experiment with some alternate fingerings to help with overall finger agility. I suggest playing the A's in mm. 28 and 29 with the 3rd finger to allow for a smoother connection to the G#'s before and after. The overall character of this etude should be light and dancelike, with an emphasis on clarity of sound. In order to enhance and maintain an efficient single tongue articulation, I suggest practicing exercises 6 and 7 from Edwin Franko Goldman's "Practical Studies".

Selection 2

Page(s): 18
Key: G Minor
Etude Title: G Minor - Lento (in 8)
Tempo: Eighth Note = 84-100
Play from Beginning to m. 23, beat 3.
Errata:
No errata.

Performance Guide:
This etude presents many challenges, like syncopation, wide interval leaps, and endurance. Be careful to choose a tempo that allows you to execute the 32nd notes gracefully, but remember that the beat you are pulsing is the 8th note, so make sure you count longer notes (quarter notes) very carefully. In measures that have syncopation and notes that are tied over (mm. 2, 4, 6, etc), you will need to subdivide, with the 16h note as the pulse, and eliminate ties when practicing. This will reinforce rhythmic stability and help to provide clarity of sound. When practicing extremely wide intervals, (mm. 3, 5, etc.) you should displace the upper note to the lower octave so both notes are in the same register. This will help ear training and pitch accuracy. Once the pitch has been well established, you can play the upper note in the written octave, using a legato tongue to connect the notes. Also pay very close attention to the dynamics throughout the etude, and shape your phrases as much as possible, even when dealing with extreme register changes and difficult rhythms. Finally, practice the etude slower than you expect to perform it in order to increase your endurance and breath control. Keep the sound centered and focused at all times, and in all registers of the instrument.

Selection 3

Page(s): 22
Key: B Minor
Etude Title: B Minor - Allegretto grazioso
Tempo: Quarter note 90-106
Play from Beginning to Downbeat of m. 58.
Errata:
Both repeats are good. Stop on the downbeat of measure 58

Performance Guide:
In order to perform this etude gracefully, (grazioso) choosing an appropriate tempo will be very important. I would recommend selecting a tempo that is closer to quarter note = 90 in order to play the grace notes and sixteenth notes cleanly. Although the sixteenth notes are all marked staccato, be careful not to play them too short. Grace notes should always be played before the beat, and in order to play them clearly, the note before the grace note should always be detached and separated. Take advantage of the many sequences by exploring a wide range of dynamics. For example, in mm. 20 and 21, I suggest playing forte the first time, and piano on the repeat. Try practicing extended sixteenth note passages both single and double tongued, and decide which fits your style of playing the best. I also suggest practicing your single tonguing slightly faster than you feel comfortable, and practicing your double tonguing slightly slower than you feel comfortable. This way there are no surprises on the day of your audition. Pay close attention to the articulation patterns, and make sure you are tonguing the notes that should be tongued, and slurring the ones that should be slurred.


F Horn

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Kling, Ed. and Rev. - Sansone 40 Characteristic Etudes Southern Music Company B131

Selection 1

Page(s): 31
Key:
Etude Title: No. 39
Tempo: Quarter Note = 120-132
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Some printings of this book may start the etude on a differently numbered page. For example, at least in one edition, it is on page 33. In any case, use etude 39. (Posted 7/24)
Measure 6 no staccato on the eb beat one.
Actually, no quarter notes in this etude should have staccato marks. (Posted 8/27)

Performance Guide:
Approach this in a very heroic manner always being aware of moving the wind through every note. (The "Eb" in m.6 should be played full value, not staccato as written.) The leggiero section in f minor beginning in m.17 should back off to forte. I like to make a slight ritardando in m.24 with a return to tempo in m.25. This not only allows a good breath in m.24, it sets up the temporary return to Ab major. Repeat this idea in mm.40-41. Make a slight ritardando with diminuendo in m.55

Selection 2

Page(s): 26
Key:
Etude Title: No. 31
Tempo: Eighth Note = 69-76
Play from Measure 1 to Measure 20, count 3.
Errata:
Some printings of this book may start the etude on a differently numbered page. For example, at least in one edition, it is on page 28. In any case, use etude 31. (Posted 7/24)

The "upper note" of the "turn" on beat four of measure 18 should be a G natural, not a G#.(Posted 8/27)

Performance Guide:
Notes that appear in the bass clef are written in old notation; they are to played one octave higher than written.  

The dotted eighth note turns (gruppettos) consist of four tones: the next scale tone above the principal tone, the principal tone itself, the tone below the principal tone, and the principal tone again. With a turn written after a dotted note and another note having the same value as the dot, the turn is played with the last note of the turn taking the place of the dot, making it the same value as the sixteenth note that follows the turn. The first three notes of the turn are traditionally played as a triplet on the second sixteenth of the beat. The sharp underneath the turn in measure 17 means to play F# rather than F natural in that turn.

Selection 3

Page(s): 16-17
Key: G Major
Etude Title: No. 19
Tempo: Quarter note 84-92
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Some printings of this book may start the etude on a differently numbered page. For example, at least in one edition, it is on pages 14-15. In any case, use etude 19.
In this etude, groups of three sixteenth notes should be played as a triplet, there are some triplet markings missing in mm. 8, 9, 12, 48, 49, 64, and 65.
There should be a slur added across the whole measure in mm. 64 and 65 (like mm. 60 and 62).

In, M.1, M.2, etc., the triplets are slurred. In measures that have the same rhythm and articulation markings as M. 17, the whole measure should be slurred.
Add staccato markings on the and of beat 1 in mm. 45 and 49, as well as m. 55 (beat 1, and of 1, and of 2).

Performance Guide:
This must be played crisply and with a strong rhythmic sense of the eighth note. When the dominate key is established in m.17 the performer should communicate a second theme thorough a strong forte and fluid slurs. Though not written on the page, I feel that a diminuendo beginning in m.32 and ending in m.43 is right. This serves two purposes: 1. It returns the dynamic to mf as at the beginning, 2. It gives the performer a chance to make one breath from m.29 to m.39. The return to the "A" section in m.44 should again be very rhythmic and crisp.





Tenor Trombone

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
H. Voxman Selected Studies Rubank / Hal Leonard No. 159 HLO4470720

Selection 1

Page(s): 20
Key: A Minor
Etude Title: A Minor - Allegro moderato
Tempo: quarter 108-120
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
This relatively straightforward etude includes some traps for the unwary student as well as several opportunities to showcase refined technique and musicianship. In general, staccato notes should be played only short enough to sound separate and light while retaining some tone and pitch information (avoid “tut”!). Strive for evenness of sound across registers unless otherwise marked – particularly in mm. 9-11, there are no accents on either the higher or lower set of notes, in contrast with mm. 12-13 where Rossari indicates accents on the offbeats. In general, the lower register will tend to “splat” out unless well controlled and practiced slowly. Other overall tips: practice the sixteenth note runs slowly and accurately. Be sure every note is in tune when practiced slowly, and work the tempo up. For example, in the descending passage in m. 8, if an F-attachment trombone is used, the B and A will probably be in slightly different second positions. Speed is no replacement for mastery!
The “Meno” section (mm. 17-28) should be played more slowly than the surrounding sections. Rossari also includes the marking “a voce spiegato,” meaning “at the top of one’s voice” – spread and full. Translating this vocal term to trombone playing: focus more on the “full” part of this marking. This is to be full-voiced and operatic in contrast with the staccato markings that make up most of the piece. Remember, music is about tension, release, contrast, and drama. Really ham it up here in the middle section!

Selection 2

Page(s): 50
Key: B Major
Etude Title: B Major - Adagio
Tempo: Quarter Note = 66-76
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
This etude replaces Etude No. 3 posted from 12 pm to 2:30 pm 7/23. (Posted 7/23)

Performance Guide:
The only reason B major is any harder than C major on the trombone is that we play in C major more often. Hiding behind this “difficult” key, then, is a beautiful little piece of music that should be played beautifully. To gain familiarity with the key, practice B major and G-sharp minor scales and arpeggios. Once you start practicing the piece, be sure not to play any faster than the speed at which you know exactly which note you’re about to play! If you’re confused, slow it down.

The phrase structure of this piece is, for the most part, fairly simple and singable. The continuing musical interest, then, comes from interruptions to this regular structure. For example, the ear should be drawn to the sforzando in m. 7, any examples of hairpin dynamics, the accents found in mm. 14-15, the fermata in m. 23, the gradual dissolving of the phrase structure from mm. 24-30, and many other spots. The more contrast you can add to this piece, the better. It wants to be extroverted! Use true piano and forte, not just mezzo-boring.

Selection 3

Page(s): 29
Key: E Minor
Etude Title: E Minor - Allegro vivace (moderato two)
Tempo: Half Note = 76-92
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Do not play the optional notes in bar 5.

Performance Guide:
Breathing is a challenge with this etude. The trick is to include so much musical direction and energy that the breaths are just a part of the music rather than an interruption or a distraction. Differentiate the slurred notes from the staccato notes but don’t worry too much about making the staccato notes short. Light and separate does the trick. On the slurs, employing natural slurs where possible and then emulating that sound when a legato tongue must be used will lend the most authenticity to what was originally an exercise for a valved instrument. Remember again to practice SLOWLY.
Regarding breathing: do take the optional breath in m. 5. A slight and graceful ritard and lift at the end of m. 8 will allow a little more time to breathe before the pickup to m. 9. It is acceptable to use rubato at the beginning and end of phrases to allow for breaths, but don’t overdo it or the audience will become seasick. Be sure to have plenty of air going into mm. 19-22 to allow for control of the low tessitura at the end of m. 22.
In the E major section that begins in m. 23, breathing becomes easier and certainly more clearly marked. Take the marked breaths, but not every single one of the optional ones, or else the phrases will sound too short. Separate out this section musically from the first half of the etude with dynamics, beautiful long and shaped notes, and perhaps some vibrato. The underlying tempo shouldn’t sag, however. Pay attention to mm. 40 and 48 – there is a gruppetto, or turn, that will take some interpretation. I would recommend employing natural slurs wherever possible inside ornaments to rest the tongue for where it has to be used.


Bass Trombone

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Grigoriev / Ostrander 24 Studies International No. 3094

Selection 1

Page(s): 3
Key:
Etude Title: No. 2
Tempo: Half note 88-100
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Omit the tied "A" and re-articulate "pedal-A" in mm. 16.

Performance Guide:
This etude is best approached with the majestic, stately style of maestoso, but at the brisker-end of the typical tempo range to accommodate for the long triplet phrases. Think of risoluto as the bold resolve one must have for a constant intensity of line. Articulation should be firm, using a "toh" syllable (especially in the low register) with an instant center of pitch. Practice articulation consistency with a metronome, on one note (using the full pitch range of the etude), starting at half-tempo and gradually increasing speed. Note lengths should be full-value and always leading with a relentless musical line.

Maintain a characteristic, centered sound throughout, especially matching the octaves. Isolate all the octaves (for example the beginning of mm. 1 and 5), practicing them slowly, matching the following octave in your head before changing the note. Utilize a tuner as a drone for this. Play the pedal-A in mm. 16.

I recommend lowering the dynamic to mf for the fourth-beat triplets in bars 10 and 14 to manage the long triplet phrases in one breath. There should be a crescendo throughout the triplet passage, leading back to ff by the octaves in mm. 13 and 16. Be sure to maintain the p dynamic in mm. 17-23, then crescendo back to the f in mm. 25. Take great care that the last quarter-notes (in mm. 18, 21 and 23) are NOT part of a triplet rhythm! In general, always play with a beautiful sound, especially in the loudest passages. Make a huge dynamic contrast for the subito p at bar 17, but be careful; it is easy to over-articulate and over-blow the p low-C. Although it is important to build your f and ff stamina through repetition, this etude may also be practiced efficiently by moving your slide while singing.

Selection 2

Page(s): 21
Key:
Etude Title: No. 19
Tempo: Quarter note 68-76
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
No Errata.

Performance Guide:
Perform this musical selection in a proclaiming, vocal style. In the A-sections, structure the phrasing in two-bar units, moving with a very light legato-tongue and leading to the beginning of the second measure as the high point. Move the line to and through the half notes throughout the piece. In general, when you lead through beat four to the downbeat of the next bar, wonderful shaping is easily accomplished. Take care to keep the air constant through the sixteenth triplets or sixteenth notes. Maintain a smooth, lyrical style to ensure the calm tranquillo marking. Keep your slide arm as soft and relaxed as possible when you transition from note to note.

In the B section (ff triplet leading into mm. 17), keep the articulated passages directional and lyrical with very clear, broad articulation. The ff passages should never sound rough or punchy, rather beautiful and resonant. Sing through this etude! Make the crescendos gradual and metered. Practice the entire pitch range of the etude on one note to study how even the crescendos can actually be. A slight speeding-up of the B-section would not only bring musical interest, but enable the execution of longer phrases without too many breathing interruptions.


Selection 3

Page(s): 23
Key:
Etude Title: No. 21
Tempo: Half Note = 74-82
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
No Errata

Performance Guide:
The semplice approach to this etude's A-section should be lively, yet straight forward with an assertive, crisp articulation. Be sure to keep the energy of line all the way to the end of each phrase. For example, don't just arrive at bar three, but continue the intensity and f through bar four, as well as in similar passages. This will also create a more dramatic subito p in bar five.

Practicing scales and arpeggios in B major will add a great deal of facility to your playing in the future. Use a slightly raised 5th position for A#'s, and a slightly lowered 5th position for C#'s in mm. 24, 28 and 29. Match pitch and color to the normal 1st and 2nd positions.

The B-section (mm. 17-31) is the most difficult passage to execute because of breathing. I recommend slight ritards at the end of measures 20 and 24 to enable quick breaths on the bar lines. Be sure to conserve air in mm. 21-22, not crescendoing until indicated. The use of natural slurs is preferable in this section.


Euphonium

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
H. Voxman Selected Studies Rubank / Hal Leonard No. 160 HLO4470730

Selection 1

Page(s): 23
Key: Db Major
Etude Title: Db Major - Con moto
Tempo: Quarter Note = 96-110
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Errata: Ms. 35-38 all eighth-notes should be marked tenuto.

Performance Guide:
Etude No. 1 is in D-flat major and contains a variety of styles/articulations along with a D.C. al coda (transitions should be reviewed before playing). The tempo/style is marked con moto (with motion) so it is important to always have a clear sense of musical direction; i.e. leading the eighth notes/sixteenth notes to the quarter notes/dotted quarter notes and or leading beat three to beat one. Additionally, anytime two notes are slurred, the second note should always be sightly lifted (Ex: the first two notes of the etude). Be sure to play the eighth notes tenuto in both mm5-8 and mm35-38 and in mm22-24 apply a leggiero style to the the notes marked staccato.

Selection 2

Page(s): 48
Key: C# MInor
Etude Title: C# Minor - Lento
Tempo: Eighth Note = 90-120
Play from Measure 9 to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Although the tempo is marked lento (slow), the style is marked con anima (with soul, or feeling), which implies that the music should be both expressive and flowing. Careful attention should also be given to the key signature, accidentals (sharps and double sharps), and articulations. In addition to using dynamics and musical inflections, vibrato on long notes and rubato in key places (such as 18, 23, and 32) are instrumental for creating an effective musical interpretation. The sixteenth notes marked staccato in m17 should be played full value with a clear articulation and the sixteenth notes marked tenuto in mm 25-26 should be tongued and slightly stressed. Additionally, the sixteenth notes on beats 1 and 4 of m27 and the downbeat of m28 should be played with a tenuto articulation and the use of legato tongue may be applied to these measures to help facilitate the large leaps as long as they are executed with good musical taste.

Selection 3

Page(s): 7
Key: Eb Major
Etude Title: Eb Major - Marcia
Tempo: Quarter Note = 94-108
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Apply the the articulation markings on the quarter notes found in mm9, 12, and 13 to the quarter notes found in mm25, 28, and 29. Disregard the accent on the downbeat of m46 (located just below the staff) and play the downbeat (high A-flat) with the same articulation as the downbeat (middle D) of m45.

Performance Guide:
This Belcke etude is in E-flat major and should be performed in march style (marcia). The opening interval (major 10th) can be learned by first practicing a major 3rd (E-flat to G) in both the middle and high range before playing as written. In order to adhere to the style, quarter notes on downbeats should be accented and the following eighth notes on beat two should be lifted/tapered (mm1-2 and mm4-6). In m17 the style changes to dolce and returns to marcia at m25. For clarification, the accents in the dolce section (mm17-18 and mm20-22) should be much lighter in comparison to the rest of the etude. Pay close attention to the slur markings in mm33-34 as they differ from mm37-38 and treat any quarter notes marked with an accent, tenuto, and staccato (mm9, 13, 25, and 29) as a weighted accent with a clear articulation that is also slightly separated.


Tuba

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Blazhevich 70 Studies, Vol. I Robert King Music No. 273 AL 28 596

Selection 1

Page(s): 10
Key:
Etude Title: No. 11
Tempo: Quarter Note = 116-136
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Disregard the practice articulations printed at the bottom of the page.

Performance Guide:
This piece allows the tubist to show off the agility and light character of the instrument. The style throughout the piece should be light and bouncy with staccatos that provide separation without being "pecky". "Allegro non tanto" means fast but no too fast. This is an appropriate marking for the piece as a tempo that is too quick will not allow the musical character of the etude to shine through. One of the most challenging aspects of this piece is to maintain a resonant and consistent sound throughout the large intervals that are incorporated in the music. Focusing on the line moving forward at all times will help the performers navigate some of the more tricky intervals. Focusing on the "big picture" direction of the phrasing will also help performers execute the more difficult sections. Performers should find a lot of benefit in blowing "wind patterns" while fingering along. This will help with getting a relaxed and clean sound to the piece. The final recommendation would be start this piece at an extremely slow tempo until all intervals are executed at a high level then slowly speed up the piece while maintaining great sound and clarity. Using this process will help elevate the final performance of the music.

Selection 2

Page(s): 8
Key: D Minor
Etude Title: No. 9
Tempo: Quarter note 70-80
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
ms 31 should have a crescendo on the half note

Performance Guide:
This etude give the tubist a chance to show the expressive nature of the instrument and demonstrate individuality as a musician. There are ample opportunities for use of rubato and other expressive gestures; however the performer must always maintain the direction of the musical line throughout. The rhythmic structure of longer note values should be maintained through the entire performance. In the con moto sections, tempos should be moved ahead and then returned to previous tempos where indicated. Following the tempo markings will greatly enhance the musical nature of the piece.

At all times, the performer should strive for a sostenuto style of playing with smooth slurs and legato articulations. Even through articulations are legato, there should be enough presence in the articulations to distinguish when the performer is tonguing or slurring. Articulations should be followed throughout except in cases where "breaking" a slur will result in better musical phrasing. One such place where this is appropriate is ms. 11-14 where observing the slur markings as written results in unmusical phrasing when a breath is needed. It is up to the performer in this section to determine what is the best music option in terms of which slurs to "break" to take a breath.

Performers may choose to use vibrato in the composition but remember that using vibrato should be approaching from a stylistic and musical standpoint and not just a mechanical device to be used on any and all long notes.

Selection 3

Page(s): 20
Key:
Etude Title: No. 21
Tempo: Dotted quarter note 68-78
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
"Forte" should be marked at the beginning of m.38

Performance Guide:
This etude affords tubists the opportunity to produce the kind of forte, marcato, pesante playing that constitutes such an important part of their role in band and orchestra. Producing a sound that is weighty and powerful, but not crass or overblown, is essential.

The success of this etude is largely dependent upon the effectiveness of the Valkyrian dotted-8th/16th/8th figure that is so prevalent. Rhythmic precision is one crucial aspect of that. Another is achieving fullness and length on the dotted 8ths combined with an appropriate amount of decay. Still another is articulating the 16th note clearly and strongly enough to maintain clarity, rather than allowing it to be “swallowed up” by the longer notes.

The “Con moto” sections must provide substantial contrast to the “Pesante” sections. In addition to the slightly increased tempo and dramatically softer dynamic, there should be a prevailing lightness that is not compromised in the several instances of repeated 16th notes. The performer must create yet another change of character around m. 23, switching suddenly to a lyrical and expressive style. These different sections bring with them vastly varying types of articulation, including a strong marcato, a light staccato, and a smooth legato (slurred). Perfecting each of these will heighten contrast and strengthen the overall musical statement.

Care should be taken to create an effective transition from m. 33 into m. 38. Similarly, the return of “Pesante” in m. 60 should be a significant event—one that creates an appropriate sense of finality.


Percussion - Snare

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
M. Peters Advanced Snare Drum Studies Mitchell Peters (NA)

Selection 1

Page(s): 22-23
Key: || Clef
Etude Title: 11
Tempo: Quarter note 118-126
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Errata:
m. 36 going to m. 37 - add notation "eighth note equals eighth note"
m. 66 - second note should be a dotted eighth-note
m. 67 - third note should be sixteenth note
The end of line 16 appears to have a blank measure in 3/4, this is not a measure. It is a courtesy time signature. There should be no break in sound between line 16 and line 17.

Performance Guide:
Careful attention to the consistency of all drags and flams in this etude should be made while preparing and performing this etude. Ornaments should be rhythmically precise and not alter the time or feel of each section. The same rhythmic roll bases that will be used at the desired performance tempo should be used when practicing this etude at a slower tempo. This will ensure that stickings will not have to change once performance tempo is met. The performer needs to clearly demonstrate the difference between roll endings throughout the etude (accented release, unaccented release, or untied rolls). The advanced performer will incorporate slight inflection during compound and mixed meter sections, which will allow for easy identification of time signatures.
This etude is a pretty straight-forward etude, however, there are a few spots that students might overlook and learn something incorrectly (e.g. length of whole-measure rests at the ends of sections). At the suggested tempo range, consistency of sound hand to hand might become an issue for m. 15 and m. 52, and, depending on sticking choice, the drags at the end of m. 49 might cause some problems with students as well. Subdivision integrity is imperative with all dotted rhythms in this etude, especially during lines 7 and 8! Etude 11 has rhythmic motives that are wonderfully used compositionally throughout this work, which gives the performer several occasions to be lyrical and musical on the snare drum despite its highly rhythmic appearance.


Percussion - Keyboard (2 Mallet)

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
McMillan Masterpieces for the Marimba Warner Bros. Publications PROBK 01202 0-7692-3374-0

Selection 1

Page(s): 30-31
Key: E Minor
Etude Title: Sonata
Tempo: Quarter note 110-120
Play from Beginning to Downbeat of m. 55 (Rehearsal G) – (roll the quarter-note downbeat).
Errata:
Errata:
m. 34 - last note is rolled (8th-note G-natural)
m. 37 - Beat 3, fourth 16th note – should be a B-natural
m. 47 - Beat 4, third 16th note – still a C-sharp. Missing courtesy accidental.

Performance Guide:
While preparing this work, students need to adhere to the suggested stickings printed in the music. Alternated stickings for the extended arpeggio figures work if starting with the suggested hand. Playing spots on accidentals (center vs. edge) might change depending on the passage. Choose playing spots that will allow for the smoothest and most comfortable playing. To help with accuracy in these sections, students should plant their feet and avoid excessive shuffling of feet or shifting of weight to each side of the body. Special attention to inflection and bringing out the melodic line should be made by the performer, not every sixteenth-note should be expressed at the same volume. As was tradition in the Baroque Era, there are not many dynamic markings in this work. Performers are expected to provide their own musically-informed dynamics and phrasing. All quarter notes that have a tie should be rolled, with focus on ending the roll on the downbeat without accenting the release. Out of preference, I do not suggest to roll the quarter note in m. 32. Make sure to note that there are eighth-note rolls, these are indicated by a capital ‘R’. This etude is the second movement (Allegro) from J.S. Bach’s Sonata for Flute and Continuo in e-minor, BWV 1034. Students are encouraged to listen to many recordings of this work to aid with their musical decisions.


Percussion - Keyboard (4 Mallet)

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Julie Davila Impressions on Wood Row-Loff Productions RLP-10052000

Selection 1

Page(s): 15-17
Key: C Major
Etude Title: Mango Bay
Tempo: Quarter note 170-190
Play from Beginning to end.
Errata:
Take all repeats, except on D.C.skip m.9, take second ending and jump to Coda as indicated.

Performance Guide:
‘Mango Bay’ is a lively, bouncy, and groovy four-mallet marimba solo which employs most of our fundamental stroke types (but focuses mainly on the double-vertical stroke and single-independent stroke). To prepare for this work, students should make sure to incorporate a regular warm-up routine in their daily practice that focuses on these stroke types. Julie Davila provides some excellent examples of warm-ups/technique building exercises on pg. 14 in her ‘Impressions on Wood’ book.

Students should make informed sticking choices. These should be determined by what feels appropriate, allows for the most fluid motions, promotes accuracy, and produces the best sound quality. Be consistent with sticking patterns as motives repeat or return throughout the work. Note that there are several viable options for stickings, choose those that work best for you! Do note the suggested sticking for m. 18.

The 7/4 time signature with syncopated endings of each bar can be confusing at first, but with consistent metronome work it can quickly become comfortable for the student.
It is important that the performer does not overplay the dynamics. Fortes should be full, controlled, and appropriate to the mood of the piece. The marked ‘senza misura’ should also be controlled and not be too extreme (we must still be able to feel the rhythm that is printed in the music). A medium to medium-hard set of mallets that produce a round and full tone would be appropriate for this piece.


Percussion - Timpani

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Orfaly Studies in Copper - 15 Orchestral Etudes for Timpani C. Alan Publications 15020 (2008)

Selection 1

Page(s): 6-7
Key:
Etude Title: Etude #2
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 70-80
Play from Beginning to Ms. 61.
Errata:
Do definitely take the repeats.

Performance Guide:
This etude focuses on one of the most common rhythms found in classical music (the dotted eighth – sixteenth – eighth rhythm); also known as the “tim-pani” rhythm. Rhythmic integrity of this motive is important. Sticking for this rhythm should be consistent, when possible, to maintain a similar inflection or stylized interpretation throughout the etude.

Double stickings, while note often used on the timpani, are occasionally needed in this etude to facilitate the musical needs. These doubles need to be executed as evenly as possible.

Rhythmic clarity can become an issue with this etude, therefore, a medium-hard mallet is suggested.

The contrast between accented and unaccented notes should be clearly heard throughout this etude, but make sure to not overplay accents. Long melodic phrases can be effectively demonstrated with control of dynamics through pacing.

Your ability to play mm. 56 – 58 should determine your starting tempo.