TMEA All-State Band Etudes for 2017-2018

This is the official listing of the Band Division All-State Audition Material. All amendments, corrections and errata will become official only when it is published here.

The TMEA All-State Performance Guides are provided as a tool to help you. Be sure to make note of any changes that may appear here during the upcoming months. Errata will not be posted in the Southwestern Musician magazine. Should you discover any errata in the music that may have been missed, please notify the State Band Division Chair, Joe Muñoz.

When printing, each instrument will begin on a new page.


Flute and Piccolo

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Mary Karen Clardy Flute Etudes Book European American Music Corp. or Schott EA 764 0-913574-96-1

Selection 1

Page(s): 12
Key: G Major
Etude Title: 7. G Major
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 60-68
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
The written measure numbers beginning with m.30 are incorrect (should be m. 31)
Piccolo: play C# and D in m. 37 8va, C-natural in m. 38 8va, C-natural in m. 46 8va, and C# in m. 47 8va
The last note should be a quarter note

Performance Guide:
This Karl-Elert etude from Op. 107 should be rapid, brilliant and light (rapido e brillante). The pulse should be felt by the measure with subdivisions indicated by the "beaming" which alternates between triplet and duplet. All etudes should be performed with a full, beautiful tone. The dynamic marking for this one is forte.

Keep the staccato notes crisp and light and aim for consistency throughout the registers. The single-, double- and triple-tongue as well as contrasting brief slurs can all be utilized here. To get started, begin at an "easy" tempo and strive for accuracy with the correct key, accidentals and indicated articulation markings. It is important to break this down into small portions for drill, isolating difficult passages and then reinserting them within the context. Give special attention to the ascending and descending leaps; you must develop the lip flexibility required to execute the technique. Remember to lift the 1st finger left hand for middle D's and D#'s. The low C# in m. 37 can be prepared by moving the pinky into position on the A preceding the C#. Breathe deeply before the start and use a full, steady air stream. Decide a breathing plan for quick breathing that works for you and practice your plan.

For musicality, remember to focus on the character of the style. Include a slight stress on the tenuto notes by giving them more weight. Consider the ritard at the end and give the last note its full quarter-note value.

Selection 2

Page(s): 68-69
Key: Eb Major
Etude Title: 41. Eb Major
Tempo: Quarter Note = 48-56
Play from beginning to m. 42 (no repeats, take second ending).
Errata:
M. 20 - The C-flat is as marked on beat one. There is no error.
M. 17 is only one beat, the notes use the printed numbering system

Performance Guide:
This beautiful Furstenau etude should be expressively performed with a beautiful tone, accurate rhythm, attention to the accidentals, good intonation and stylistically-executed ornaments. The pulse should be felt by the quarter note with four beats to the measure. A full, vibrant sound and musical maturity with some freedom of ebb and flow should be foremost in importance with this etude.

From the beginning, practice with a metronome on the eighth note as well as the quarter note to ensure the accuracy of the subdivision. Experiment with slight rubato to give yourself freedom of expression and room to breathe. Follow the indicated dynamic markings which can be quite unexpected. Many books such as the Rubank "Advanced Method for Flute" have good instructions for ornaments. It is acceptable to place the gruppetto on all quarter notes (mm. 6, 14, 24, 32, 35, 40) on the 2nd eighth note of the beat. For the turns on the dotted eighth notes (mm. 19, 20), it is acceptable to place the turn on the 2nd 16th of the beat so that the rhythm of the entire beat is a 16th-32nd note triplet-16th-16th. All ornaments should be slurred.

Remain diligent with the correct fingerings for middle D and E-flat (the 1st finger left hand must be lifted). The thumb B-flat fingering can enhance the technical ease of the etude, but remember to remove it for B-naturals and high G-flats. Breaths can be taken during rests and in other musical places, if needed. Possibilities for the "if needed" are: breathe on beat 3 in mm. 6 and 14 and between mm. 34 and 35 (quickly). Customize a musically artistic breathing plan that suits you and practice your plan. Give yourself adequate opportunities to inhale enough air so you can play with a beautiful tone through the etude. Although most of the piece is slurred, pay attention to those notes which are to be articulated and use a legato-style tongue.

Selection 3

Page(s): 70
Key: C Minor
Etude Title: 42. C Minor
Tempo: Dotted Half Note = 52-63
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Piccolo: M. 1 - Play the first note one octave higher
Piccolo: M. 2 - Play the last note one octave higher
Piccolo: M. 16 - Play the last note one octave higher
Piccolo: M. 17 - Play the C one octave higher

Performance Guide:
This Karg-Elert etude from Op. 107 should be very smoothly executed with swells in dynamics which, for the most part, follow the musical line. The pulse should be felt by the measure. Use a full, vibrant sound. It is marked "appassionato e stretto" which means with passion, energy and quickening.

At the beginning, practice slowly with three beats to the measure. Use a metronome. Learn to utilize the thumb B-flat effectively. Use it for B-flats and switch it off for B-naturals and high G-flats; C's and C#'s provide good places to make the change. For example, start the etude without it, add it for m. 6, remove it in the middle of m. 7, etc. Remember to lift the 1st finger left hand for all middle register D-naturals and E-flats.

Strive for an even tone in all registers and develop lip flexibility, especially for the big leaps, by playing octave slurs and harmonics. A smaller aperture on the higher notes will help. The low register needs to be quite strong so that the high notes do not jump out. The high notes must be prepared (not necessarily played softer) and the air stream must be steady throughout. Breaths can be taken in all rests, between mm. 21 and 22 and between mm. 33 and 34. Plan your breathing places and practice your plan. Although most of the piece is slurred, pay attention to those notes which are to be articulated and use a legato style attack.


Soprano Clarinets

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
David Hite Artistic Studies, Book 1 - From the French School Southern Music Company B362

Selection 1

Page(s): 63
Key:
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 18
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 72-84
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Clarification: for m. 31: the e-natural carries throughout the measure. (8/17/17)

Performance Guide:
While slow, consistent practice with metronome in eighth note pulse will help develop steady pulse and rhythmic accuracy, this etude is best executed feeling a “big beat” pulse in 2, so that the numerous roulades flow lyrically. Be attentive to practicing and preparing with optimal sound and constant air support. Match tone between stepwise notes and arpeggiated notes alike, so that the sound is smooth, even and matched throughout. Maintain a fast, focused air stream when crossing the breaks to minimize the difference between throat tone notes and all others. Provide a solid river of air throughout for notes to float upon while follow the cascading shapes of line with the air. Place the 32nd notes in measures 5, 6 and 13, 14 with rhythmic accuracy. Feel and hear each note of the 32nd passages clearly, cleanly, and evenly. Because the key temporarily modulates to minor at measure 17, the marked meno mosso is an effective expressive element. Be sure to take the initial tempo when the theme returns at measure 25. Check fingerings carefully, particularly at measure 40, so that whenever C follows or precedes an E-flat, it is played with the left pinky. Accents and tenuto markings provide stylistic intensity. Observe them carefully, using faster, denser air rather than heavier tongue stroke. In measures 46 and 48, observe articulation markings diligently with a light yet clear tongue stroke. The large slurs over the bars indicate phrasing.

Selection 2

Page(s): 66
Key:
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 21
Tempo: Quarter Note = 58-66
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Clarification: The double sharp in the m. 15 "cadenza" applies only to the note it precedes. (8/17/17)
M. 24: grace note F double sharp does not carry through the measure. (revised 8/16/17)

Performance Guide:
This soulful etude provides a wonderful opportunity to showcase beautiful, singing sound while playing in an expressive operatic style. Develop as refined a sound possible on each note and in all dynamics and registers. Use care to find optimal resonance fingerings for throat tones. Take full, deep breaths throughout, and constantly support the airstream for as smooth, even, and connected phrases as possible. Be sure to have a tempo in mind before starting; it is typical to choose a tempo while considering faster moving passages. Accuracy of double dotted quarter notes and be sure they are distinct from dotted quarter notes. Measures 15 and 16 may be considered as cadenzas, so it is appropriate to perform these measures with flexibility in tempo. For the turn in measure 19, it may be easier to use the side trill keys to play B-natural of the turn if sound is not adversely affected. Check fingerings carefully in measure 21 in order to avoid an unnecessary pinky finger slide. Keep the trills in measures 22 and 24 lyrical. It is acceptable to use a single trill, if necessary, to maintain grace and elegance in the phrase. While preparation with metronome is helpful to develop a constant sense of subdivided pulse, a musically satisfying performance will profit from a sense of rubato and flexible time throughout Follow the shapes of phrases convincingly, adding nuance where suggested by musical markings.

Selection 3

Page(s): 37
Key: G Major
Etude Title: 40 Studies, No. 35
Tempo: Quarter Note = 96-104
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
M. 2, m. 4, m. 8, m. 38, m. 40 - each grouping of four sixteenth notes should be "slur two - tongue two" - In some published editions this is correct, in other editions marked differently
M. 11 - beat two articulation should be "slur two - tongue two" - In some published editions this is correct, in other editions marked differently
M. 32 - beats 3&4 should be under one slur as in measure 34

Performance Guide:
This etude is best approached with a joyous, dance-like approach. Throughout the etude, be sure to hear each note of sextuplet figures distinctly, cleanly, and accurately. Execute each sextuplet with rhythmic accuracy. Accents are always essential to musical style, however, use faster, denser air for these rather than heavier tongue stroke. For any staccato marking on an eighth note, hear space between the notes. Using the syllable, “toot”, will help. For staccato markings on sixteenth notes, hear the beginnings of notes clearly using a light tongue stroke and avoiding heaviness. It is likely helpful to use the right hand side trill key to play the B-natural of the turn in measures 14 and 16. Avoid clipping the ends of slurs in measure 20, and keep air moving underneath this section with variation in articulation. Measure 25 provides a wonderful opportunity for musical contrast; you may decide to use a sweeter, more singing and lyrical approach. The gentler articulation style of measure 32 creates an effective contrast to the opening articulation style. Measure 36 may be treated like a cadenza and may be interpreted freely before returning to playful style and an energetic finish.


Low Clarinets

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
David Hite Artistic Studies, Book 1 - From the French School Southern Music Company B362

Selection 1

Page(s): 50
Key:
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 4
Tempo: Quarter Note = 88-108
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
It is important to practice fast etudes slowly in order to learn finger patterns with accuracy. Make an effort to play this etude musically as well as technically, and feel empowered to take some time before breath marks and especially fermatas.

Work for light, even articulation, and focus on staying relaxed when playing. There are several series of repeated articulated notes in this etude, and the beginnings of these notes should all sound the same. Strive for consistency in where the tongue hits the reed, how much of the tongue hits the reed, etc., and the corresponding sound will be equally consistent.

Consistency of rhythm will be crucial for proper execution this etude as well. Try practicing a passage of the written sixteenth notes in different rhythms (dotted eighth-sixteenth note, sixteenth note-dotted eighth, etc.) and then practice the same passage as written. This will aid in evenness and shine a spotlight on passages that are not under the player's control. Adding right hand fingers through this etude facilitates technique and improves tone quality and intonation. (Ex: right hand may be down on m. 1, 14, 17, 21 -24, 33, 35, 36, 39, 42 and 43) Lean on notes indicated with accents rather than hitting notes in mm. 3, 14, and 26.

Trill left hand ring and little fingers simultaneously for trill in m. 37.
The trill in m. 40 is played by depressing the throat tone G-sharp key and trilling the A-key. G-sharp carries through the grace notes.

Selection 2

Page(s): 66
Key:
Etude Title: 32 Etudes, 21
Tempo: Quarter Note = 56-64
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Cadenza clarification: M. 15 begins with the quarter note E and ends with the 16th note F-sharp.
M. 16 begins on the quarter note low E under a fermata and ends with the quarter note G-sharp at the end of the line. The half note B beings measure 17.
M. 24: grace note F double sharp does not carry through the measure. (revised 8/08/17)
Contra Bass Clarinet Only
M. 15: Beat 2 and the following cadenza grace note figure (starting on the high E ending with the F sharp) down an octave. Go back to the written octave on beat 3 (E on the top space of the staff). (revised 8/08/17)

Performance Guide:
The initial marked tempo of quarter note=76 is too fast for this etude, so the proper tempo range should be from quarter=56-64.

This etude should be played with dramatic phrase shapes and plenty of intensity. Take the "cantabile" making at the beginning seriously and play as though singing though the instrument. When executing accents in the upper register (for example, the A's in measure 13), be sure to keep the air speed fast to avoid undertones. The cadenza in measure fifteen should feel free and effortless. Lean on the half step of the E to D-sharp interval that begins each section of the cadenza, and start the grouped 16ths slowly and speed the line up as it descends and changes to 32nd notes. Note the "Meno mosso" at the end of bar 15 and slow the cadenza passage down as the notes change from 32nds to 16ths. Strict tempo (quarter = 56-64) should come back in measure 18.

The turn in measure 19 can be executed with the trill fingering for B (A key plus the top side key) and then use the regular B fingering for the 8th note on beat 4.

Selection 3

Page(s): 16
Key:
Etude Title: 40 Studies, No. 15
Tempo: Quarter Note = 80-92
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
M. 1: the articulation pattern of measure 1 should match measure 2. Slur four, slur two, slur two.
M. 26: Bb should be B natural. (revised 8/08/17)

Performance Guide:
This etude is a tour de force in left hand dexterity. Pay close attention to hand position and always remember to play with relaxed, curved fingers.

Be aware of the changing articulation patterns. Since the majority of this etudes features slurred passages, make sure to bring out the few staccato and accented notes by making them special. Strive for musicality even though this is a technique-oriented etude; as the musical lines rise let the sound gain intensity. There are some subito dynamic markings (measures 19 and 51 for example) that should be taken seriously. Equally, there are long passages where no dynamics are indicated (measures 35-45 for example), so feel empowered to be creative add some shape to these phrases.

The high D's in measure 55 can be fingered with the overblown open G fingering for ease of technique. If necessary, the player can leave only the register key down to aid in hitting the correct partial. The high C-sharp in measure 61 can be fingered with the overblown F-sharp fingering (adding the register key as necessary), or with the thumb, register key, and two side keys.


Oboe and English Horn

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
W. Ferling, Revised by Andraud 48 Famous Studies for Oboe or Saxophone Southern Music Company B103

Selection 1

Page(s): 1
Key:
Etude Title: No. 2
Tempo: Quarter Note = 92-108
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Ferling Etude #2 in C Major

Each of the Ferling etudes contains a host of challenges and oftentimes features 1 or 2 in particular. In this case of this particular etudes, the feature challenge is rhythmic in nature. This particular challenge, that of maintaining the consistency and stylistic integrity of the dotted rhythm, is made more complex by the nature of the articulation. In the opening 6 measures this feature difficulty is introduced carefully. The student is only required to perform that particular rhythm 4 times over the course of 24 beats. However, in m. 7 the rhythm appears on 7 beats in a row. This often trips up the student making them slow down or get increasingly sluggish. One solution for this problem is to avoid following the tempo marking to literally. Quarter note=104 ends up being quite brisk when you take the feature rhythm into account, and therefore ends up being too fast to capture the spirit of this particular etude in a clean and sophisticated manner. The other component that allows the student tho thrive rhythmically in this etude has to do with the release of the dotted note. It needs to be quite snappy and lifted to create the musical energy necessary to allow the dotted rhythm to flourish. Other elements to consider are the complexity and variety of the articulation, length of staccato notes, and considerations for fingerings for the F's (eg. m. 3). In general the student should keep this etude light and bouncy and play it with a great deal of snappiness and vigor.

Selection 2

Page(s): 15
Key:
Etude Title: No. 29
Tempo: Eighth Note = 88-104
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Ferling Etude no. 29 in E Major: This etude feature dotted rhythms within the context of a slower, more lyrical approach. It needs to high a sprightly, light-hearted feel but within the context of a slower tempo. In m. 3, the student must fit a turn in one 16th note. This is a matter of developing fluent finger motion and not rushing the turn. The beat here can be expanded every so slightly so that the figure maintaing its eloquence. The 32nd notes in measure 4 pose a similar problem Have the student lean slightly on the first note in each of those groups (D#) so help make them sound unrushed. There is a short cadenza in the 6th measure which should be approached like an opera fantasy cadenza. Make sure the student doesn't rush and instead takes their time at the start and end of it for musical drama and cleanliness. The first note in each dotted figure should have a slight lift, not too clipped, but lifted to make the dotted rhythm sounds elegant and tasteful.

Selection 3

Page(s): 14
Key:
Etude Title: No. 28
Tempo: Quarter Note = 108-126
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Ferling Etude no. 28 in c minor:

It is important in this particular etude to demonstrate a shading of dynamics within the mf, f, ff range. The music indicates the a ff in measure 2, but I would suggest taking that marking with a grain of salt. The first big arrival or climax doesn't occur until m. 8. Everything builds to that arrival, so it is important to save dynamic presence for that moment. I would suggest starting at mf.
The small number 2's over the E-flats indicate the use of the left-hand E-flat key. The high F in measure 20 can be played using a short fingering (thumb octave, half-hole, second finger, right-hand A-flat key); forked F should be used in the arpeggio that follows. This etude features many downward slurs which can be difficult to execute cleanly and elegantly on the oboe. Have the student practice downward glissandi on the reed alone from a C to an A-flat to cultivate and hone the necessary voicing shift for a downward slur. This etude needs fiery, dynamic energy to have the character required. A responsive, resonant, and stable reed is necessary to execute it properly.


Bassoon

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Milde, Edited by Kovar Concert Studies, Opus 26, Volume I International Music Company No. 467

Selection 1

Page(s): 8-9
Key:
Etude Title: No. 4
Tempo: Quarter Note = 96-104
Play from beginning to downbeat of m. 40.
Errata:
m. 6: Beat four, first eighth note should have a beam through it indicating it is two sixteenth notes and not an eighth note. (revised 7/25/17)
m. 39: The grace notes that follow beat four should be under a slur, but the downbeat of m. 40 should be tongued.

Performance Guide:
The greatest challenge presented by this etude is articulation. Articulation should be clean, precise, even, and light in every octave, at every point in the phrase, and at every dynamic level. It is very important to practice this etude very slowly, and listen carefully to your articulation quality as you play. Try not to think of the staccato markings as indicating notes that are choppy and harsh, but are lightly separated by a little space. Following the dynamic markings will help you shape this etude into a piece of music, and not simply a technical exercise in articulation. In the passages with dotted eighth-sixteenth notes, keep the subdivision (straight sixteenths) in your mind from the previous passages to make sure the pattern does not turn into triplets. There are very few slurs in the etude, so take care to shape them as musically as you can, so that you can create pleasant contrasts. The notation in the second half of m. 1 indicates that the tonguing pattern of straight sixteenths should continue (as it does through m. 7 and later in the etude).

Selection 2

Page(s): 6-7
Key:
Etude Title: No. 3
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 48-56
Play from m. 1 to 16, then skip to m. 43 and play to the end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Etude #3, E-flat major, Adagio

Tempo: Dotted quarter = 48-56

Cuts: Play from beginning through m. 16. Cut to measure 42, play to the end.

Errata: None

Performance Guide: In addition to playing a wonderful musical line, one of the greatest challenges in this etude is counting. The only way to ensure that you’re playing the correct rhythms is to subdivide eighth or sixteenth notes in your head constantly, most especially during long notes. Once good rhythm is established, use dynamics and vibrato to shape each phrase. A good tactic for shaping a long phrase is to plan out your dynamics. For example, the end of m. 6 is piano, and builds over several measures to a forte in m. 12. Choose the points in each measure where you would like to reach mp and mf, and stick to your dynamic plan. Practice attacks and releases for each note out of context, so that you can create soft attacks and beautifully tapered releases in each phrase. A beautifully shaped phrase can be ruined by a rough or sudden release.

Selection 3

Page(s): 16-17
Key:
Etude Title: No. 8
Tempo: Quarter Note = 88-108
Play from m. 1 to 35 then skip to to m. 47 and play to the end (see performance guide for exact details).
Errata:
M.13: beat 4, third sixteenth note should be F-sharp, not F-double-sharp
M. 14: the up beat of beat 3 should be an A natural not A# (revised 8/18/17)
M. 32: beat 4, should be an F-sharp, not f-double-sharp (8/18/17)
M. 22: beat 3, mordent should be C sharp to D sharp, not to D natural (revised (8/18/17)

Performance Guide:
Play from beginning through m. 35, adding a ritard in beats three and four, and a comma for a breath at the end of the measure. Cut from the end of m. 35 to the beginning of m. 47. Measure 35 is a tempo; play to the end.

Although it might seem difficult at first, this etude is a very musical, melodic piece that presents technical challenges as well as some chances for beautiful, singing, musical moments. As you work through the mordents (short trills, in measures 2, 3, 21, 22, etc.), make sure that they are even and similar in tone and speed, so that they match each other throughout the piece, but especially so they match other mordents within a phrase. This etude has different sections with different moods. Don’t be afraid to use vibrato expressively within this technical context to provide contrast and musical direction. As you navigate large leaps, or long slurs that cover a wide range of notes, be conscious of your voicing (the shape of the inside of your mouth and throat, as well as tongue placement). Use lower voicing (think “oh” or “ah”) for lower notes, and higher voicing (think “ooh” or “ee”). During the more lyrical section (mm. 25-32 or so), use voicing as well as the variety of attacks given (like housetop accents as the phrase intensifies) to help yourself make the large leaps in a musical way. There are several fingering challenges in this etude, like the mordents, or the slur from G-sharp to D-sharp in m. 32. Utilize the internet and other resources at your disposal to find fingerings are well in tune and respond well on your instrument. This etude also has difficult clef changes. If you are learning tenor clef for the first time, challenge yourself not to write in note names. If you must, write in one note name per measure, maybe for a big leap or challenging moment, but erase them as you become comfortable with the clef.


Contra-Bassoon

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Milde, Edited by Kovar Concert Studies, Opus 26, Volume I International Music Company No. 467

Selection 1

Page(s): 2-3
Key:
Etude Title: No. 1
Tempo: Quarter note 60-72
Play from beginning to m. 18.
Errata:
None

Performance Guide:
When learning this etude on contrabassoon, take great care to let clean technique and conservative tempos guide your practice. This etude offers a variety of dynamics and articulations; take advantage of those indications to give a musical performance despite the technical challenges. As you play through the long slurs that cover a wide range of notes, be conscious of your voicing (the shape of the inside of your mouth and throat, as well as tongue placement). Use lower voicing (think “oh” or “ah”) for lower notes, and higher voicing (think “ooh” or “ee”). Use the indicated dynamics to shape your phrases and keep musical interest at all times. Keep staccato notes light and bouncy (this is a singular challenge on the contrabassoon), to provide a nice contrast to the smoothness of the slurs. As you raise your tempo, consider putting the metronome on half notes instead of quarter notes. This will help you make sure your internal subdivisions are correct, and to feel the piece “in two,” which helps create longer phrases and musical interest.




Saxophones

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
W. Ferling, Revised by Andraud 48 Famous Studies for Oboe or Saxophone Southern Music Company B103

Selection 1

Page(s): 13
Key: Eb Major
Etude Title: No. 26
Tempo: Quarter Note = 108-120
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
m.13 - beat three, second 16th note should be Bb not C.
None (revised 7/26/2017)

Performance Guide:
This etude focuses on chromatic passages, large intervals, syncopated articulation groups and enharmonic pitches. At the very beginning of preparation, utilize side C, side B-flat and fork F-sharp in chromatic passages to train the fingers to play more efficiently. For example, M. 4 should use side B-flat instead of Bis. Watch out for frequent C-flat pitches (mm. 3, 4, 9, 14, 20)! Passages with large intervals (mm. 3, 7-10, 9, 12-14, etc.) need special attention paid to voicing so that ‘cracks’ don’t occur; a good way to do this is to practice the interval without tonguing. Articulation speed will also be an issue; spend time practicing mm. 19-22 to increase tongue speed, and use it to determine performance tempo. Emphasize lightly any syncopated articulation pattern (mm. 1-2, 4-6, 9-10, 17-18, etc.) to keep the energy up. Do not force dynamics; there is only one listed but that does not mean one should perform the entire thing without style. Use patterns and sequences (6-7, 19-20, etc.) as opportunities to use light crescendos, and new phrases (m. 9) to drop slightly quieter. Above all, make sure to start by practicing very slowly; this will allow you to prepare the right alternate fingerings, avoid blips, subdivide well, and eventually play quickly with ease, all of which are essential to playing this etude successfully.

Selection 2

Page(s): 10
Key: G Minor
Etude Title: No. 19
Tempo: Eighth note = 76-92
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Etude #19 is marked as Andante, so don’t let it drag; the phrasing will feel much more natural if the tempo doesn’t slow down. This etude requires dynamic changes, a good number of ornaments, and a constant sense of phrasing across different rhythms. Tone and phrasing should be top priority, so pay particular attention to tone as the dynamic changes from piano to forte and back. To ensure that musicality is controlled, try practicing phrases without any vibrato or articulation; when the phrase becomes controlled gradually add articulation and vibrato back in. Phrases begin at mm. 1, 11, 19, and 27; they should be practiced as such. In addition, learn to phrase lines perfectly before adding trills and grace notes; adding them too soon can cause rhythm problems. For additional pulse control, practice only trills or only grace notes before doing both simultaneously. B-flat to C-natural trills (mm. 4, 30) should normally use side B-flat and trill the index finger on the left hand; using Bis and side C can only be used if the resulting C-natural is perfectly in tune. Vibrato usage should be consistent and tasteful; keep high notes (m. 23, etc.) under control. Finally, make sure that the dotted 16th – 32nd note groupings (mm. 1, 5, 6-9, etc.) do not turn into triplets; keep them snappy but don’t let them interrupt the line.

Selection 3

Page(s): 15
Key: E Major
Etude Title: No. 30
Tempo: Quarter note = 108-120
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
M. 20, the up-beat of beat three should be F-sharp, not F-natural.

Performance Guide:
Playing etude #30 successfully requires light articulation, frequent dynamic contrast, a quick tempo, and emphasizing compound melodies. Articulation will probably be the limiting factor of a player’s speed, so make sure to clarify articulation through precise practice of extended articulation passages (mm. 2, 19-20). Also be careful to play patterns exactly as they appear; sometimes beats 1 and 2 of a measure change the pattern, and this should be emphasized (mm. 2, 15, 18, etc.). Compound melodies (mm. 3, 4, 6, 19-20) can be practiced by splitting apart the two voices and only practicing the higher or lower voice; this should be easy to hear when performing at a faster speed. Do not over-emphasize articulations but keep the style, light, precise, and dexterous. Emphasize syncopated articulation patterns with very light accents (mm. 10, 22). Treat chromatic lines like pickup notes that push the phrase into the next downbeat (mm. 4, 11). Don’t neglect dynamic changes, especially opportunities to play soft (mm. 3-4, 12-13, 20). For phrasing, pay close attention to building tension in passages with repeated material (mm. 6, 10, 12, 13-14, etc.). Finally, utilize a quick, energetic vibrato as frequently as you have eighth notes or longer (mm. 7, 8, 16, 24).



Cornet/Trumpet

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Wurm, Voisin 40 Studies for Trumpet International No. 2025

Selection 1

Page(s): 22
Key:
Etude Title: No. 23
Tempo: Dotted Half Note = 58-74
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Tempo range should be dotted half note (not dotted quarter note = 58-74 (revised 7/25/17)

Performance Guide:
This moderately technical etude is fun to play and needs to sound graceful and nimble throughout while maintaining a dancelike “waltz” character. A slight emphasis on beat 1 and floating the rest of the measure will help with this so that the music always feels like one beat per bar. Practice slowly with metronome for rhythmic accuracy paying attention to tongued vs. slurred rhythms. Keep the airflow steady during slurred passages maintaining smooth note connections and a consistent tone. Daily practice of Clarke Technical Studies will be helpful for this. Always begin phrases with a full breath.

Articulated passages need to sound as smooth as slurred passages. Staccato markings should sound light and graceful, not overly short or harsh. Let only the tip of the tongue move as you articulate while keeping the flow of air as steady as if slurring or sustaining a single note. Additionally, it is imperative to keep the lips and jaw stationary while articulating. If the lips or jaw move, the tone and pitch will be affected and the line will sound rough. A helpful exercise for this is to practice blowing a fast articulation pattern on one hand while keeping the other hand on your chin and/or lower lip. Make sure the chin and lower lip stay perfectly still as the tongue moves to articulate. For extra practice with slurs and arpeggios refer to Arban’s pp. 48-51, 56, 144 and 146.

Selection 2

Page(s): 32-33
Key:
Etude Title: No. 35
Tempo: Quarter Note = 50-60
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
This etude should be performed with great lyricism and expression. The use of vibrato will be helpful in providing a vocal quality to the music. The performer may also use a little rubato, making some passages start slowly, speed up and then slow down within the structure of a steady beat. The grupetto or “turn” in m. 11 should be played like m. 9. Measure 26 should be treated as a cadenza. In keeping with the esspressione character of this etude, a legato style should be employed throughout. Keep grace notes and 32nds smooth and relaxed. Round out the ends of phrases so they sound polished and refined. Maintain a warm sound in all registers and dynamics, and never let the tone become edgy or aggressive – intense and dramatic, yes, but never edgy.

Very little information is given regarding dynamics; therefore it is suggested that the performer follow the shape of the melodic line and provide dynamics consistent with the direction of each phrase while still maintaining the character and color of the last printed dynamic. Keep the air moving through descending passages in order to maintain good tone and response. Keep your listener engaged by making the music express emotions or tell a story. Recommended studies for this etude include Clarke Technical Studies pp. 14-20 for work on smooth trills and Arban’s pp. 99-103 for exercises on the turn.

Selection 3

Page(s): 9
Key:
Etude Title: No. 7
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 74-94
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
This etude is all about double tonguing in 6/8 time. While it may be possible to single tongue within the proper tempo guidelines, a double tongue is preferred in order to keep the music sounding light. Single tonguing will tend to make 16ths sound heavy and overly emphasized, while double tonguing will make them dance and move forward. Avoid extremes (too short or too legato). Strive for clarity of attack along with a steady airflow. In speech the vowel is just as important as the consonant. The same holds true for double tonguing. Make sure your tone remains centered and beautiful between the T and K. Refer to Arban’s pp. 175-178 for extra practice double tonguing. Play the exercises slowly making the T and K articulations sound exactly alike – same start, same tone, same pitch. Also try reversing the T and K, or using all Ks in practice.

Musically this etude should sound playful, not harsh or frantic. Emphasize the downbeat and let the rest of the measure float. Practice m. 16 slowly with double tongue using a metronome. Gradually speed up keeping the rhythm steady. Breathe quickly and efficiently where indicated. For quick breathing open up and get the tongue out of the way of the moving air. If you hear a hissing or slurping sound, you are breathing incorrectly and inefficiently. Say “Woe” or “Hup” backwards. The “P” at the end of “Hup” gets your lips back into playing position after the breath.


F Horn

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Kling, Ed. and Rev. - Sansone 40 Characteristic Etudes Southern Music Company B131

Selection 1

Page(s):
Key:
Etude Title: No. 9
Tempo: Quarter Note = 86-100
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Some triplet markings may be missing from the part (m. 17 on beats 3 and 4, m. 18 on beat 3, mm. 21-22 on beat 1, 3, and 4, m. 23 on all beats, and similarly in mm. 24-28. Ms. 29, 31, and 32 all have triplets on beats 3 and 4). There are some eighth notes that are grouped together that aren’t triplets, such as mm. 9, 11, and 15.
The piu vivo is marked to begin on beat 2 of m. 36.

Performance Guide:
The emphasis on this etude is maestoso, and the performer should pick a tempo that feels stately. The fieramente direction at the beginning refers to the dotted eighth-sixteenth pickup notes as well as sustained long notes for energetic phrases. Choose your opening tempo wisely, as you will need to go a little faster (not much) at the piu vivo in m. 36. Bass clef notes are written in old notation style and should be played an octave above where they are written (mm. 35-36). The trill in m. 16 should be played as a lip trill (f side, open fingering to play C-D).

Selection 2

Page(s):
Key:
Etude Title: No. 36
Tempo: Quarter Note = 50-56
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
M. 4 contains no triplets, just straight eighth notes.
M. 5 the accidentals should only refer to the note they are next to and shouldn’t carry over. M. 5 There is a B-natural missing: the note right before the F (dotted eighth note).

Performance Guide:
All bass clef notes are written in old notation, meaning they are played an octave above where they are written (mm. 2-4, 6-7, 10-11, 14-15, 18-19, 26-27). The player must overdo the dynamics and phrases in this etude, and it is recommended that the player record themselves at a distance in order to determine if they are conveying the phrase correctly. Players must sustain through tied notes, especially in the low register sections marked marcato. If there is too much decay at the ends of the long notes the phrases will be too short and separate. The ad libitum sections are marked to be performed freely. Taking more time on the fermata notes and playing with rubato is essential, but always make sure that you are playing musically and making sense out of the phrase. Marcato accents should be played with weight as opposed to a harsh attack, and players will need to take more notice of accents in the low register, as these notes will be un-centered and unfocused when approached with a heavy articulation.

Selection 3

Page(s):
Key:
Etude Title: No. 25
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 52-60
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Hairpin phrasing marked in m. 6 should be repeated in ms. 22, 30, and 107.
M. 30: first note should be a dotted eight note. (revised 8/18/2017)

Performance Guide:
While it may seem appropriate to choose a faster tempo for this etude, look ahead to mm. 77-82 and choose a tempo that will work for the sixteenth notes. This etude should be felt in one (not three) and therefore should have more emphasis on the downbeats (except when asked to accent a weak beat). This is particularly important in mm. 33-48, where it will be more natural to emphasize the high note instead of the downbeat. Keep all staccato notes light.


Tenor Trombone

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Fink Advanced Musical Etudes, 112 Studies based on Blazhevitch's Etudes Accura No. 154

Selection 1

Page(s): 72-73
Key:
Etude Title: No. 91
Tempo: Quarter Note = 84-94
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
This technical etude will help students develop a proficient slide technique in both the low and high range. The etude will present several demanding scale and arpeggiated passages in a challenging key.

Use a “Too” or “Tee” articulation and play each note with a good front. Place a little more weight on all eighth-notes and a little less weight on the sixteenth-notes that follow. Be sure to support each line and keep the air moving through the sixteenth-note passages. When playing slurred figures like in mm. 1-5, avoid any glissando-like sounds.

Make all dynamic markings, tempo changes, and style markings noticeable. To assure good rhythm, practice this etude with a metronome and keep a steady pulse.

When practicing some of these passages, play them slow several times and make sure to focus on note accuracy, articulation markings, alternate positions, and rhythm placement. In instances where tied notes are found (mm. 9-12), make sure to move in time.

Play all G-flats above the staff in a raised 3rd position. The low D-flats below the staff should be played in a lowered 5th position when using the F attachment.

In mm. 15 and 21, a slight ritardando may be implemented to help accommodate the low range passages.

Considering the key of this etude, alternate positions will be a must throughout. When experimenting with alternate positions, it is important to match tone qualities of the home position and the alternate position. A tuner will be most beneficial. Some examples of alternates that may be used in this etude include: playing an F-natural in the staff in 6th position, playing a low B-flat in a lowered 3rd position with the F attachment valve, and playing a B-flat above the staff in a raised 5th position. Ultimately, it will be up to what each student feels most comfortable doing and what each student sounds best doing.




Selection 2

Page(s): 73
Key:
Etude Title: No. 92
Tempo: Quarter Note = 58-64
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
This lyrical etude will require mastery of a proficient legato tongue, high range, and playing endurance.

The Lento (quarter note = 58-64) and Con Moto (quarter note = 80) sections should be performed with a smooth and light legato tongue. Using a “Doo” or “Dee” articulation and blowing the air through the phrases will help achieve this style. For stylistic clarity, lightly articulating every note is recommended. If natural slurs are preferred, be sure to avoid playing any extra notes when going through the partials and avoid any glissando-like sounds when playing in the same partials.

Make all dynamic markings and tempo changes noticeable. Keeping a steady subdivision or pulse is important and will assure rhythmic accuracy. To enhance the quality of the performance, adding characteristic vibrato and subtle rubato is encouraged.

When practicing some of the passages written in the upper register, playing them down one octave will help learn the correct intervals and prolong endurance during each practice session.

In m. 45, playing the 2nd and 3rd F in 6th position and the E-natural in 7th position may be an option for many trombonists. In m. 50, the note before and after the E-flat grace note may be lip slurred for a smoother articulation. Throughout this etude, be sure that the G-flats above the staff are played in a raised 3rd position and all G-naturals above the staff are played in a raised 2nd position.

Selection 3

Page(s): 61
Key:
Etude Title: No. 81
Tempo: Eighth Note = 170-180
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
This technical etude will help students develop an enhanced understanding of compound rhythms. Considering that this etude fluctuates in style throughout, great attention to articulations will need to be a priority.

Make all dynamic markings and tempo changes noticeable. Keeping a steady subdivision or pulse is important and will assure rhythmic accuracy. To enhance the quality of the performance, adding characteristic vibrato and subtle rubato is encouraged.

When practicing some of the passages written in the upper register, playing them down one octave will help learn the correct intervals and prolong endurance during each practice session.



Bass Trombone

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Grigoriev / Ostrander 24 Studies International No. 3094

Selection 1

Page(s): 11
Key:
Etude Title: No. 9
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 66-94
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Titled Veloce and with the instruction of brillante, this etude is a fun and exciting piece of music!

In preparing yourself to practice this piece make sure and emphasize D major scale and chromatic scale in your practicing. Choose a tempo that works well for YOUR playing; this etude can be played at a wide range of tempi in a convincing manner. 66-94bpm for the measure (when counting in 1) is a tempo range that I feel is appropriate for this etude.

The middle section, should be played in a lyrical and smooth manner. It is important in this section to think in large phrases of 4 and 8 measures, while still feeling the music in 1. Try and use as many natural slurs as you can, without adding slurs that aren’t written. I like to add a slight ritardando in measure 61 or 62 to prepare the fermata at the end of this section.

As with any piece of music, I encourage you to use slide positions that work best for you and your playing. I do not always use the slide positions recommended by the editor of this book, because they do not always work for how I play. Choose positions that highlight the best qualities of your sound.

Selection 2

Page(s): 19
Key: E Major
Etude Title: No. 17
Tempo: Quarter Note = 68-72
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
With a lyrical and somewhat free style, this etude is one of my personal favorites in this book. Although the opening section’s tempo marking, Adagio, notates a slow tempo, I recommend you find a tempo that achieves that while still preserving a sense of forward motion in the music. I use a range of tempi for this part of the etude, around 68-72bpm, depending on my approach on a given day.

When considering the style of this etude, consider the marking amoroso. From the Italian, Amore, Gregoriev gives us the wonderful marking of “loving” to describe to us how to play this music. In doing so take care to maintain a sustained style of playing and use your natural slurs. Another tool you might consider when referring to the affect amoroso is rubato. From the Italian rubare (to rob) the practice of employing rubato means the player will “steal” time form one part of a given phrase, thereby stretching notes and momentarily slowing down the tempo, and returning the time later in the same phrase, thereby speeding up the time. When done correctly the overall duration of the phrase will not change much, but how time is felt within the phrase will.

The middle section of the piece, marked Animato, should be just that; forward moving. Play it at a faster tempo then the surrounding music, while taking care to preserve the lyrical style of the overall etude. I like to use a range of 78-84 for the Animato section. The curious marking of both legato and staccato in the Animato section is called portato and is common in music for string instruments. When string players see this marking, they continue moving the bow while slightly pulsing the rhythm, so that a line that is both connected and articulated is produced. For brass players, I recommend using a continuous air stream while tonguing every note lightly and distinctly. At the end of the Animato section take care to transition smoothly back into the Adagio style. I like to add a slight ritardando before the fermata in measure 34, and usually do so only on the last three notes of that section. Similarly, at the end of this etude, the marking calando also notates a gradual calming of the music, created with a gradual slowing in tempo and the marked diminuendo.

Selection 3

Page(s): 16
Key:
Etude Title: No. 14
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 58-66
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
In a light and dance-like style, etude no. 14 presents the bass trombonist with both musical opportunities and challenges.

I interpret this etude’s tempo and style markings Allegretto and leggiero as “quick, but not as fast as allegro” and “lightly”. This can be a challenging combination for any bass trombonist, especially in the low register. I like to use a tempo in the range of 58-66 for the measure (in other words, multiply by 3 to get the individual 8th note tempo).

While counting this etude in 3, it is important to still feel it in 1. Experiment with emphasizing the downbeats and lightening up on beats 2-3. This will help the leggiero style come through in your playing. I like to add a slight rit. in measure 39 leading into the fermata in measure 40, but otherwise I play this etude at a consistent tempo.

F-sharp minor is a key some high school musicians don’t play in very often. When preparing this etude make sure to practice your related scales often: F-sharp minor, C-sharp major, A major, E major, and chromatic scale as well. Doing so will insure that you are familiar with the basic building blocks of this technical etude. Articulating lightly and with clarity in the low register, while maintaining an even sound between the middle and valve registers is the central technical challenge of this etude. I encourage you to experiment with your articulation to see what sounds best in each register for your playing.


Euphonium

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
H. Voxman Selected Studies Rubank / Hal Leonard No. 160 HLO4470730

Selection 1

Page(s): 25(BC) 27(TC)
Key: Bb Minor
Etude Title: Bb Minor - Allegretto
Tempo: Quarter Note = 90-104
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
The term legére means to play in a light, or airy style. Therefore, even if you don’t see a staccato mark over a note in this piece you should continue in the same style. However, it is best to not think of the 1/16ths as staccato as you are learning this piece. Start practicing it at a slow, easy tempo, playing only the 1/8ths as staccato. Be sure you don’t play the 1/8ths too terribly short at the slow tempo or they will sound “pecky” at the fast tempo. Think of them as simply separated, or detached from the other notes. As your tempo increases in later practice sessions the 1/16ths will start to sound staccato naturally. Try to play 4 measure phrases, and be sure to add your own dynamics so the music has direction and expressiveness. Playing the last 8 measures in one breath is a challenge, but it can be done if you take several small breaths leading up to it from measure 32 to 36.

Selection 2

Page(s): 34 (Bass Clef); 36 (Treble Clef)
Key: D Major
Etude Title: D Major - Andante Sostenuto
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 50-58
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
M. 9 -- slur begins on eighth note D#;
M. 17 -- 2nd and 3rd notes (C#'s) should be tied;
M. 28 -- 2nd and 3rd notes (D's) should be tied
M. 7 - Last note in measure is to be played as an A natural.
M. 25 - Count 4 - 2nd note of triplet should be played as an E natural.

Performance Guide:
Play this lyrical etude in a legato style, as the indication sostenuto suggests. You must continually keep an 1/8th note subdivision in your mind as you play, so spend a lot of time doing this etude with the metronome set to the 1/8th note getting the beat. Some use of rubato would be appropriate in spots. Use vibrato, but don’t let it sound mechanical; learn to shape it to color the sound of a note or to add intensity. Listen to great singers like Mel Torme or euphonium players like Brian Bowman to get an idea of the possibilities. When doing the trills in m. 7 you should try fingering the “D” with 1st and 2nd valves to make it easier to smoothly trill up to “E”. You might also try the “A#” and the “C#” grace notes fingered 2nd and 3rd if that makes it more fluid for you. In m. 11 and others you have notes with a slur over staccato marks, or “portato”. Play these notes as slightly separated but legato tongued, or “long-lifted” as some call it. The turn in m. 24 is difficult—refer to the bottom of page 2 of the Voxman for an example of how to do one. The tricky part is how fast this one has to be executed. Start the turn immediately upon playing the “E” 1/8th note, and make sure you finish on the “F#” 1/4 note on beat 4 of the measure.

Selection 3

Page(s): 31 (33)
Key: Gb Major
Etude Title: Allegro ma non troppo
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 76-90
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
Bass Clef Book: m. 15 - downbeat should be marked mf (mezzo forte);
m. 29 - beat 2 dotted eighth note A-flat should have an accent mark

Performance Guide:
The challenge of this etude is not just the rhythm, but expression as well. There are very few dynamics marked, so you must add them yourself to create musically interesting phrases. In regard to rhythm, you must spend most of your practice time with a metronome on this piece giving the 1/8th note the beat at a slow tempo. Speed it up gradually as you become familiar with it, but always go back and do it slow again for precision. This will get you through the tricky tied note section starting m. 15. You should also make sure you only use accents where indicated. Play all the notes in this full value. It’s all right to have a bit of a bounce to the style, but make sure the 1/16th notes are heard clearly; don’t “ghost” them as many end up doing.


Tuba

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Blazhevitch 70 Studies, Vol. II Robert King Music No. 274 AL 28 597

Selection 1

Page(s): 31
Key:
Etude Title: No. 61
Tempo: Dotted Quarter Note = 60-68
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
m. 6: Missing slur between Bb and Eb. (revised 8/2/17)
m. 24: Last eighth note should be an Ab (revised 8/2/17)

Performance Guide:
Strive to bring out the differences between the lyrical eighth-note sections and the light articulated sixteenth-notes. Practice working through the f-minor and c-minor scales in all three forms to help with note accuracy. As you work on the sixteenth-notes, listen to ensure that staccato is not too short but a light full note. Also use your tuner to help keep repeated notes in tune in addition to octave intervals. Internalizing the 6/8 feel is very important when working on this etude. Always practice with your metronome beating the eighth-note pulse to keep from moving the time too much. The performance tempo should a quick moving allegretto but not too fast as the con moto section will require a quicker tempo than the start. Too quick a tempo will create a frantic performance and affect articulation. Make sure that the dotted quarter-notes are played to their full value, especially when followed by an eighth-rest or tied to an eighth-note. Another rhythmic area to review can be found in mm. 11-12. Be careful not to rush the dotted eighth-note sixteenth rhythm. There are not many dynamic differences marked but the etude lends itself to several areas where added cresendos and decresendos will work well. One such instance is the buildup to the Ritard / A Tempo (mm. 25-26). Experiment with performing this etude with added dynamic contrast to present a musical performance.

Selection 2

Page(s): 16
Key: Bb Minor
Etude Title: No. 51
Tempo: Quarter Note = 68-76
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Above all, you must always keep the cantabile style in mind when working on this etude while also be careful that the performance tempo is not too slow. It is a good idea to listen to a few Classical vocal recordings to help hear the style and it is a great advantage if you sing through the etude once the pitches are familiar to add the vocal performance quality. Do not neglect to accelerate the tempo for the con moto section and keep this change in mind when deciding on the overall tempo. Work hard to make sure that the Tempo 1 section is the same as the start tempo. Practice playing through the Bb minor scale in all three forms and its relative Major scale modes to feel comfortable with the etude. Play through this etude in eighth-note subdivision to help with both the syncopation patterns and in order to avoid cutting the dotted quarter-notes short. You can also try playing the dotted quarter-notes in a sixteenth-note subdivision to help place the sixteenth-note patterns in perfect time. One rhythmic pitfall to avoid is confusing the written eighth-note triplets (example m. 3) with the three eighth-notes barred together (example m. 2). The triplets should have a compound meter feel with a slight weight on the down beat while the three eighth notes should be played in duple meter leading into the next downbeat. The important musical aspect of this etude is the strong downbeats juxtaposed by the leading feel of both the two sixteenth-note and three eighth-note patterns. The few syncopation patterns should be emphasized but be careful that this emphasis does not disrupt the flow of the etude. Don't forget to add more dynamic contrast when playing through this etude.

Selection 3

Page(s): 10-11
Key:
Etude Title: No. 48
Tempo: Quarter Note = 124-132
Play from beginning to end.
Errata:
m. 15: Bb quarter note should tie to the Bb eighth note in the next bar.  (revised 8/2/17)
m. 47: Remove the slur on beat 1. (revised 8/2/17)

Performance Guide:
Aggressive musical energy should be the ideal goal for this etude. You want to be careful the articulation is not too heavy on the dotted eighth-sixteen note rhythm and always played with a good note release. Strive to make the eighth note lines as light and musical as possible without creating too much of a staccato attack. Listen to a pizzicato bass line for a good example of how to approach the eighth notes. Pay close attention to the written articulation markings as they are quite varied and will help create the musical effect needed for the etude. Use your metronome to play the long sustained lines to their full value. The half-notes tied to quarter-notes will feel like a long time and even more so when tied to an additional eighth-note. Maintaining concentration on these long sustains will be important during performance. There are not many marked dynamic markings but there are several areas of repeated musical phrases that can be used to create more dynamic contrast. The objective should be to build through the repeated rhythmic phrases until you reach a longer sustained note and push through until the next repeated phrase. This etude is in the key of Db Major so focus your practice on the major scale and its different modes to help prepare and build finger memory.


Percussion - Snare

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
M. Peters Advanced Snare Drum Studies Mitchell Peters (NA)

Selection 1

Page(s): 38-39
Key:
Etude Title: 19
Tempo: Quarter Note = 68-76
Play from beginning to End.
Errata:
M. 9 – second half of measure should be 32nd rest followed by a 32nd note and a 16th note, then four 32nd notes.
M. 18 – The last note of the measure should be a dotted-quarter note.
M. 25 -
In older editions of this etude only, this measure may not be complete. The quarter note on beat 2 should be followed by an 8th rest at the end of the measure.

Performance Guide:
This challenging etude explores the full palette of snare drum idioms. It includes a wide dynamic range that requires considerable soft playing as well as sudden, extreme dynamic changes; standard concert ornaments (flams, drags, and four-stroke ruffs in particular); concert rolls of varying length; and rapid playing at all dynamic levels. The etude will certainly test the player's abilities to execute each of these idioms.

The metrical modulation in ms. 18 and again in ms. 53 may be confusing, but quite simply the beat remains consistent throughout; in ms. 18, the feel changes from a duple subdivision to a compound one, then back again at ms. 53. Once the player has determined his or her desired tempo, the metronome can be set and remain unchanged throughout the etude. Note that the triplet eighths at the end of ms. 17 are the same speed as eighth notes in the 6/8 section.

One of the most challenging passages involves the execution of the ruffs in mm. 26-29. These ruffs must be cleanly articulated and very fast so as to distinguish them as an ornament. Given that the release note is accented, the recommended sticking is r-l-l-R. This gives the player a greater opportunity to set the hand for the ending accent. However, as this is a more complicated sticking to execute, l-r-l-R is a good alternative, but again the final accent must be clearly articulated. Care should also be given to distinguish these accented eighths with the non-accented eighths. The consecutive ruffs between ms. 28 and ms. 29 are most tricky.

Likewise, the quality of the flams throughout the etude must be consistent. In the concert style, one must be careful not to play these flat. This consistency of quality is particularly important in mm. 50-51, where the flams are embedded in a straight sixteenth-note context. The performer’s sticking choice will influence how successfully this passage flows and how consistent the flams sound.

All rolls should be in a concert (multiple-bounce) style. It is recommended that the rolls in ms. 45 be played as one-hand multiple bounce followed by a tap with the alternate hand on the release 16th note. Players may elect to play attempt rolls as two bounced 32nd notes, but the player must not let the rolls sound too crushed, accented, or louder than the surrounding notes.

It is essential to master the full range of dynamics indicated in the etude. In particular, special attention should be given to developing control and evenness in soft playing. Clearly bring out accented notes; however, as mentioned above the performer should carefully distinguish between accented and non-accented grace notes and roll endings. In particular, do not arbitrarily end rolls with an accent; only accent roll endings where indicated. And, when playing the accents never let the tone quality become harsh.


Percussion - Keyboard (2 Mallet)

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
McMillan Masterpieces for the Marimba Warner Bros. Publications PROBK 01202 0-7692-3374-0

Selection 1

Page(s): 10-11
Key: F Major
Etude Title: Sonata
Tempo: Quarter Note = 104-116
Play from beginning to end, no repeats.
Errata:
M. 19; Roll the eighth note occurring on the upbeat of count 1.
M. 20; Do not roll the staccato quarter note on count 3.
M. 38; The last 16th note of count 2 should be a Db.

Performance Guide:
This piece is the second movement of Handel's violin Sonata III. It is strongly recommended that the performer listen to a recording of this piece by a violinist. This will help with interpretation decisions.
All of the quarter notes in this piece should be rolled. In m. 18, roll the A on beat three and do not strike the downbeat of beat four. Simply roll until beat four and then proceed with the sixteenth notes starting on the G.
Most of the stickings written in by the editor work well. Mm. 3-4 is the only place where another sticking will work better than the one given by the editor. If you double the left hand going from m. 3 to m. 4, the distance between the two doubled notes is smaller than doubling the right hand at the beginning of m. 4. Students should not feel confined to the stickings given by the editor if another one works better for them.
There is an accidental omitted in m. 38. The last sixteenth note of beat two should be a D-flat, not D-natural. Then the flat carries throughout the bar and is heard again after beat three.
Practice with a metronome and start slowly to ensure correct notes, rhythms, and dynamics.


Percussion - Keyboard (4 Mallet)

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Mark Ford Marimba: Technique Through Music Innovative Percussion Inc 2005

Selection 1

Page(s): 36-37
Key: A Minor
Etude Title: Kain
Tempo: Quarter Note = 124-130
Play from beginning to downbeat of m. 35 (with repeats).
Errata:

Performance Guide:
Kain is a four-mallet etude that primarily utilizes double vertical strokes. The etude is written in an ABA form with the A material creating a right hand groove ostinato while the left hand presents thematic material. Contrastingly the B section (at bar 15) is legato in nature and allows for the right hand to perform a smooth, fluid mysterious melody. This melody transforms at bar 24 as the music transitions back to the A material at bar 35, the cut point for this audition material.

This short solo demands that the player balance double vertical strokes in order to hear the moving lines. Listen carefully and be sure that the ostinato (or repeated material) is not louder than the melody (or the moving line). Keep your body square (straight forward) to the marimba and practice slowly. Slow practice will allow you the opportunity to preset the double vertical strokes above the notes to be played. The repeat from bar 12 back to bar two can be awkward, as both hands must reset. For practice, try repeating back to bar one until your right hand makes the adjustment easily.

Notice that the sticking for the legato melody starting in bar 15 utilizes one mallet. Follow this sticking. It is important for players to keep the melodic line in one mallet. This allows better control over the tone and dynamics of the melody.

The trickiest part of Kain is from bars 24-27. For a strong tone keep your right hand mallets in good playing positions on the bars, especially when playing the g-sharp in the outer mallet. Let these bars grow in intensity to the forte/piano marking at bar 28. Keep the dynamics soft but intense as you approach bar 35 and then create a dramatic ritard before the “a tempo.” Overall, exaggerate your musical ideas and expressions.


Percussion - Timpani

Book - Editor Title Publisher Edition
Orfaly Studies in Copper - 15 Orchestral Etudes for Timpani C. Alan Publications 15020 (2008)

Selection 1

Page(s): 10-11
Key:
Etude Title: Etude #4
Tempo: Eighth Note = 190-204
Play from beginning to Ms. 52 (no repeats).
Errata:
m. 34 - cresc. starting on beat 4 to beat 3 m. 35
m. 35 - beat 3 should be marked mp

Performance Guide:
Play from beginning to end of measure 52, no repeats.
Eight note 190-204
 
Drum sizes
32” – A
29” – D
26” – E#
23” – F#
 
M. 19   32” – Bb, 29” – Db
 
M.39   32” – Gb
 
In measure 34, insert a crescendo starting on beat 4, continuing to beat 3 of measure 35. Beat 3 of measure 35 should be marked mp, and there after the decrescendo as written should be observed.