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Q&A for Teachers

From 2007-2010, TMEA members asked and answered over 300 questions featured in a Southwestern Musician article series called "Tutti". Over 3,000 answers were submitted by TMEA members in response to practical questions ranging from pedagogy to fundraising. This bank of valuable knowledge and experience is available here and is searchable by topic and/or magazine issue.

Listed below are answers and questions published in the September 2014 issue of Southwestern Musician. If you would like to view another issue's questions and answers, select an issue from the drop down box and click "Go".

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How do you ensure the pacing for a beginner class is appropriate and supports individual as well as ensemble progress?
Submitted by: Anonymous, Answered in: September 2014
We make sure that each student plays individually for the class everyday. With short class periods, this is done by turning on the metronome and going down the row. It doesn't take very long and students are held responsible for their practicing. It also helps us assess mastery both individually and for the class.

Submitted by: Linda Smith
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My students are my guide so I check for understanding as a whole class throughout my lessons.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I try and teach to the top students but end up teaching more to the middle. I try and get as many to understand the concepts as possible and hope the others learn by doing. I spend most of the time having the students play their instrument.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I keep lesson plans from previous years as well as notes on what worked and what didn't work. I then go back and adjust accordingly. This helps not only keep me and my classes on pace but also prevents me from making the same mistakes. In addition, when I see a weakness in the ensemble, I look back to the beginning year to see how it could be fixed for future years. ....Plan , plan and re-plan!

Submitted by: Leigh Ann McClain
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The awareness of students' non-verbal communication is critical. If I have lots is shifting in chairs and blank looks, it's a signal to reteach. One of the other things I've seen work well is to employ peer tutoring and working in small groups (usually no more than 4) to offer opportunity for students to figure out the details of the concepts. The small group format allows the teacher to move among the groups and more efficiently determine where students are being successful and where they need more support. Making notes allows me to modify my lesson plans to ensure better understanding. I have also found that how I format my questions makes a difference in how students express themselves. I feel it's important to help students understand what they know and what they yet need to learn.

Submitted by: Bonnie Kuehl
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I have a designed curriculum to follow minute by minute

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I only work/teach on an individual basis. But I tend to push beginners from the start, even before their first lesson. I plant the seed that we will be moving "fast" to cover as much music as possible.

Submitted by: Bill Atkerson
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Although there are drawbacks to this approach, I tend to read and respond to my classes rather than plan out at the beginning of the year where I want them to be at certain times. As a result, the pacing of my beginner classes varies widely from one year to the next.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Honestly I always start at the very beginning with the assumption that the students don't know anything. Fortunately they quickly show me what they do know and we start moving. I try to keep track of who has gone to the board for each type of lesson so the same people aren't always answering. When we play fundamental games everyone has to participate and that shows me a lot.

Submitted by: Amanda Ransom
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First of all beginners are just that beginners. We are expecting them to go from kindergarten to sixth grade within a certain time called the year. Many of them struggle some of them never make it to the expectations for them for that that year, however it is possible to have characteristic sounds, musical understanding, and a general idea of how this device called a horn operates at its basic level. Many people say practice makes perfect I disagree perfect practice makes perfect. Therefore I tell my kids go home and practice on what you can get perfectly and then work on something that you have to perfect, play anything but be prepared for the test. They come back stronger with more endurance and more excitement because now they're enjoying the horn, when a kid wants to enjoy what they're doing they can amaze you by the progress on a simple 15 minutes. Ensemble sound is just simply listening to your neighbor, we are never to play louder or weaker than I hate therefore Balance and Lane will take care of itself with a little help as they progress.

Submitted by: Mr Jessie C Smith
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I try to identify my leaders in the first week. The leaders in my beginners class exemplify a love of music, so I make sure to pair them with a student that has never been in choir or doesn't know much about singing. I have had a lot of success with my beginner classes, simply because this is where they learn proper technique, show a willingness to learn, and want to please me. My strong students are given a practice room to improve, while I work with the students that are struggling. I find that I have created a happy balance with my girls' show choir, simply because I have listened to them together and individually. Sometimes, there is a soprano that needs to be a soprano II or alto, simply because she has a beautiful blend with another alto. I switch the voice parts around, simply because I don't have to follow a district's guidelines with regards to SSA. I also have a pop show choir that consists of boys and they are incredible! That being said, I get to pick and choose who I want in each group, so each student represents the best qualities a choir director looks for: blend, great pitch, great musicianship, and parents that are incredibly supportive.

Submitted by: Erika Warren
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Ensure that a good tone quality is the primary goal for all students will lead to correct pacing and well blended ensembles.

Submitted by: Andy Thompson
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Time management.'

Submitted by: David Jasso
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Planning a class for the future, but thus far teaching only private lessons

Submitted by: Kathy Aldridge
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All of my beginners play games to help the repetition of learning basic muscle memory be less tedious. This helps me cater to the whole class instead of having to worry about certain individuals not being able to keep up.

Submitted by: Nancy Householder
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Tracking of each individual student's progress. They will all progress at a different rate so it is important we address all of the needs for all of the kids. Offering extra help if necessary.

Submitted by: Richard Sullivan
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Using sight singing books and monitoring individuals as they sing. Dividing the choir into sections and allowing the section leader to control the pace of his/ her section.

Submitted by: Tracy Collins
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I push students to want to play the faster or harder music and the ones who do want it practice. The ones who don't practice end up dropping, so I have smaller classes that play better rather than large classes that don't play well.

Submitted by: Katie James
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Consistent small group assessment allows me to know where each individual is on the material being covered. I give a short rhythm assignment set, for example, and hear small enough groups perform alternate lines of it together in the rehearsal. I can tell what each member did, if the groups are small enough (usually 3-5 students ) and give a pass/fail grade (with + and - also) on my seating chart. I hear everyone at least twice a week on some elements of fundamentals I am teaching. The assessment then guides the pace of instruction and the strategies to be adjusted for some individuals.

Submitted by: Trebleshooter
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As I was taught, I cover concepts in my beginner class using one small step at a time. When most of the class is obviously not 'getting it,' I try using another strategy to teach the concept until there are better results. When I want to demonstrate mastery correct repetition (or give the students a chance to practice during class), to keep the rehearsal from becoming monotonous, I have the students take turns playing using classifications. For example: "Everyone wearing red play measure 2 with all of the right notes" (or tennis shoes vs. sandals, etc.). This allows me to hear the students in different groups, and the middle school students have a blast when I call out the categories ("Am I wearing red? No I'm wearing green, so I sit this one out. Tennis shoes? Yes that's me.")
I also try to hear each student alone at least once during each lesson, usually on something short, such as a warm up note or a couple of measures out of a different piece of music. They get a mini-lesson with individual feedback and help based on their performance.

Submitted by: Stephanie Wlodkowski
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Take the time to hear each student every week and this is not via performance testing. Time must be taken to hear every student on a skill and help those who need it with mastery. I teach my beginner classes more like a master class where everyone is involved in the discussion.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I try to at all times be sure that I understand the capabilities and needs of the most advanced students and the least advanced students. I base the range of my instruction between those extremes. Each day I leap back to the beginning of the unit and then inch forward, making sure that the most advanced student is challenged as well.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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we follow the district generated scope and sequence based on other models from around the south Texas area that were studied.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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As the beginners progress through the beginning band book in use, the class is tested each day on one or two of the lines assigned the day before. If the majority of the students can successful perform the line then the class moves forward. The students are also placed in chair order according to their performance skill on the lines they are tested on. The students get to the point that they are motivated by the chair placement they receive on the test.

Submitted by: Randy Bloodworth
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Research shows that even adults loose focus after more than an hour. Pace is driven by the progress of the group. However, if they loose focus, pick up the pace. Remember the famous quote from "The Music Man","Friends, the idle brain is the devil's playground! You got trouble!"

Submitted by: Nelson Nolden
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In a typical beginner class you should have two primary goals. #1 it should be educational. Students should be respectful and actively participating at all times. If a student is not attentive they are most likely not learning. As the teacher you must know the level of every student and help them. This starts by hearing them individually as much as possible. Never spend more than 8-10 minutes on one concept. Keep things moving. It is even possible to work on the same concept longer, just call it something else. #2 you must have fun! Tell a joke, the lamer the better. Ask them questions. Make sure you have set a ground rule from day one, that you are the teacher and they must be polite and raise their hand to speak. You can generally read a beginner class pretty well through body language. Beginners often learn best through stories.

Submitted by: Christian Holzer
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For beginners especially I think it is important that they feel challenged but never lost or overwhelmed. I try to achieve this with short bursts of high intensity learning sprinkled in fun, engaging activities.

Submitted by: Krista Lundquist
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My coteacher and I push the students as far as we can until December. At that point, we assess the level of the classes and individuals and then we divide the classes based on those levels. For instance, we have a low brass and clarinet class that meet at the same time. In January we will either keep them going separate or we will make two ability based classes that have a mix of the two groups. One of us will keep one group moving forward and the other will re mediate and review from the previous semester.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Pacing in beginner classes can be challenging. Most beginner classes don't move at the same rate, so it's a balancing act to try and keep the classes somewhat at the same level for when they come together for full rehearsals and performances. I find it useful to keep track of where each class is weekly through my lesson planning to make sure students are staying on the right track for the six weeks/year. When particular students start to lag behind, it is helpful to do paired peer help so that they are encouraged by each other to keep working toward a common goal/objective.

Submitted by: Katie Lewis
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detailed pre-assessment during the year before instrumental instruction is begun

Submitted by: Brian Boecker
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The best way to check for proper pacing is to look to the students. As you teach the material, they will let you know through their actions if the pace is right. Students who are enthusiastic, but can't play (with acceptable sounds) are moving too quickly. You need to slow them down and work on the fundamentals. Students who play well, but don't seem very interested are moving too slowly. Try spicing up the lessons with a few extras in all sections. You can give them more challenging notes to learn or more complicated rhythms on specific notes. Pacing is everything and in the end will be one of the deciding factors as to when the first performance will be. Paced correctly, beginners who meet 3-4 times a week can usually perform at Christmas. In a nutshell, listen to the group and the individual sounds and the pacing will reveal itself to you.

Submitted by: Stanford Lewis
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We have recently been able to divide students into classes that are more suitable to their skill level. So, for instance, high school girls can be placed in beginner level, advanced junior varsity level, varsity women level, and varsity mixed level all depending on the skill set as well as behavior, and dependability.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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We have vertical alignment to insure that all directors in the same high school cluster collaborate to establish curriculum and stay on the same page.

Submitted by: Bill Watson
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I give as many chances for solo exploration as possible, and keep the rest of the class engaged by supporting each child as they explore.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Our classes are sometimes homogeneous/sometimes heterogeneous so the pacing varies from class to class. I like to introduce new material on Mondays and Tuesdays, decide on a line to test on Tuesday, work on that line some on Tuesdays and Wednesdays while still moving forwards in the book, test on Thursdays, and then Fridays are make up days and a day where kids can play off lines for merit badges. Some weeks, depending on the concept, we fly. Other weeks, we crawl. We want to make sure everyone has a grasp of the fundamentals of good tone production and a working knowledge of fingerings and rhythm.

Submitted by: Julie Tyler
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Find that mid point of the class where everyone can achieve. Then give the better students extra tasks privately and those struggling time outside of class.

Submitted by: Aaron Allison
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Make sure the learning is fun so that even those who are not beginners are still enjoying themselves (using games/hands on activities to teach concepts).

Submitted by: Corey Fisher
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Every student will move at their own pace. Unfortunately there is a middle ground that must be maintained in order for a group to stay together.
I try to make sure stragglers get as much help as they need and that the students who can work ahead have enough to keep them interested.
Peer teaching is a good way to accomplish this though one must be careful how it is approached so everyone knows they are equals. Again, I set the tone.

Submitted by: Timothy Kochen
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I try to keep students playing as much as possible. I try to do something new everyday (read a new line, learn a new technique, or a new note) we also review everyday. By having the students play something by themselves (usually a long tone) I can quickly asses where students are at and keep pushing them forward without leaving anyone too far behind.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Differentiation

Submitted by: Terri Littlejohn
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I do a lot of small group pull outs where I will work with a section or the new comers to the band. It allows me to give more personalized instruction to them and catch them up to the rest of the band.

Submitted by: Cary Vanarsdall
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I really like the 6 second tryout idea. I try to apply that concept to the entire classroom experience.

Submitted by: James Keltner
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What technology solution has become part of your everyday instruction or individual assessment? How has it helped?
Submitted by: Anonymous, Answered in: September 2014
Head mics save voices. Period.

Submitted by: Kristi Savage
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Every 6-12 grade student is issued a MacBook at the beginning of each school year in our district. We subscribe to a website called "MyBigCampus.com" This is basically Facebook for schools. Our music is published on this closed site so I never hear, "Someone stole my music," or "I left my music at home." Combining this site with the music writing program, Notion, our students have access to our pieces at all times. Sections can be highlighted, listened to, tempos adjusted, rewritten, etc. on the spot. We do not have to make copies or put together folders because it is all online. Copyright laws allow this since website access is limited by the band staff and all music is erased after performing. This website also allows us to give assignments online with deadlines enforced automatically, much like colleges do every day. We are able to publish announcements, calendars, have discussions, post itineraries, Q&A, all on this site. IT IS WONDERFUL!!!

Submitted by: Douglas Morris
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I am a new convert of Smartmusic and it has been very useful with regards to sight reading and learning their solos and UIL music. I really like that students can use the computer and take personal responsibility for their learning by coming in on their own time to use the program.

Submitted by: Maria Chadwell
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SmartMusic is used for assessments. Many students have their own subscription. This allows students to get immediate feedback on at least the technical aspects of their playing when they are at home or practicing at school by themselves.

Submitted by: Linda Smith
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In our Beginner Band classes we use Tonal Energy and a game called Staff Wars on a regular basis. We project these onto a wall for the students to see. Tonal Energy helps with student ear training, and Staff Wars helps with student note recognition and ear training (the note must be played correctly and in tune).

Submitted by: Stacy Clark
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We use a mimio board projector. II display rhythm slides and can mark on the displayed image. One click and the marks are gone. I use my iPhone to show the next slides.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Video recording on iPads has transformed how our students analyze their own performances in choir rehearsals, dance rehearsals and in the voice studio. We are able to upload videos from their iPads to google drive where the students may securely review their performances. At times we ask them to answer questions through google forms.

Submitted by: Joshua Brosn
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Ipad, Apple TV, projector, speaker system. Great apps for classroom organization, discipline, learning, games, etc. I use Patti DeWitt adopted textbooks and they are available online, so I can also project them as we need them. I scan purchased music to show on the screen so the kids can see as I mark on it, etc (ipad app).

Submitted by: Anonymous
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ThreeRing app has transformed the way I assess and record my students' progress in class. ThreeRing allows me to take notes, make audio/video recordings, and enter assignments and grades using my mobile device. I have the app on my iPhone, iPad, and computer, and anything I add on one device is automatically synced to the others. The recording function has been particularly helpful with playing tests: when students or parents have a question about a grade, I can play the recording for them and explain specific problems and re-evaluate the grade assigned if needed.

Submitted by: Curtis Donohue
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IPad,

Submitted by: Anonymous
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As a private teacher, electronic tuners and metronomes. That and access to many resources (recordings, sheetmusic, videos) via the internet.

Submitted by: Bill Atkerson
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SmartBoards help with almost every element of instruction. If love them!

Submitted by: Anonymous
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My kids use Zondle every day. It's a free app/website available on any computer, tablet, or smart phone. The teacher creates topics (or borrows them from someone else), and assigns them to classes. The students choose one of the assigned topics and a game they're like to play while studying. They get lots of good practice embedded in fun games and you get detailed feedback on each child's progress within the various topics.

Submitted by: Patrick Lollis
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I use my Roland RM 700 digital piano all the time for EVERYTHING! I have my accompanist come in and record the accompaniment for our songs and use it in rehearsal. We record it on a midi file so I can slow it down or speed it up, transpose or layer in voice parts as needed. My students learn how to use it and can rehearse themselves when we split up in sections. I honestly don't know what I would do without this piano.

Submitted by: Amanda Ransom
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I love apps ... I just found one in technology to give you the fingerings for every possible instrument how amazing however when dealing with students
I love using my SmartBoard. It is a real tough call between that and my iPad. Most of my students use the iPad are some smart phone. This is aided us in expediting chair test, pass off of grade sheets, scales and any other required material.

Submitted by: Mr Jessie C Smith
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I thoroughly love using my son's iPad to see what he has created on Garage Band! I compare it to writing a song in Sibelius and choosing what instruments I would use in creating a piece of music. I like to give my son and my other music students a blank canvas. I have a MIDI keyboard, so when my piano students have a lesson, I let them experiment with my MIDI keyboard. I assess what they have learned from one lesson to the next by letting them play what they have learned. When they realize they are playing what is on the page of music, they get very excited about practicing at home!

Submitted by: Erika Warren
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Working to get smart music, for now, using a tv to show tuning and various rhythms on Finale.

Submitted by: David Jasso
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To my surprise, youtube. I may hear an interesting piece of music on the radio as I'm driving to campus. I can walk into the classroom, cue up a youtube video of the piece, and have the students comment on what they're hearing, and have them try to write it down. I can email the link to the particular video to the students during class, for their further listening/viewing. This is a wonderful supplement to our other aural skills exercises and resources. It's also great for the students to see what the performers look like. Many of the students at our community college have never had the opportunity to attend a performance by a professional orchestra, for instance. I keep a list of various youtube resources that I can recommend to students who need to hear further help with concepts being studied in class.

Submitted by: Allyson Wells
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Computers and my music teachers' web site for my business, amp and microphones, recording software. Given that many years ago, I never recorded nor amplified lessons and given that I kept all records of my student information in pages a little notebook, the new technologies are so great. I love other web sites and internet searches for personally doing research on special challenges...and read current articles by many experts in the field.

Submitted by: Kathy Aldridge
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We don't use much technology . The kids all of tuner apps and metronome apps and sometimes we use free online software that I learned about in clinic at the last tmea conference. Unfortunately, most of my students are too low income to help my studio support technology in Class.

Submitted by: Nancy Householder
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Smart Music has been invaluable in tracking our beginners and our 7th and 8th grade students.

Submitted by: Richard Sullivan
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At the beginning of class (as students are coming in) it is my goal to have YouTube playing on a big screen with choirs singing. Many of my students have never heard any other choir but their own.

Submitted by: Tracy Collins
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I record student rehearsals with an iPad and play it for them via Apple TV.

Submitted by: Katie James
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The Harmony Director

Submitted by: Anonymous
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You Tube and Naxos for instructional resources. A Korg tuner, metronome and colored pencils for added technology.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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eiki elmo overhead projector connected to a VDU computer with a document camera. I can now connect my android device to project both video and audio using this setup/.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I have been using a great app for keeping grades, seating charts, calendars, schedules and more. It is called iDoceo. It is colorful and keeps so much information all in one place. You can even store pictures of your students in the seating chart area- great to print out for a sub. You can find iDoceo on the App Store on your apple device. As yet I have not seen this app available for PC formats.

Submitted by: Mark Parker
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I couldn't LIVE without my document camera/projector!

Submitted by: Krista Lundquist
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Smartmusic has become part of every day in every class. The beginners rarely ever play without it and the performing ensembles use it in many of their performance preparations.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Musictheory.net has become a wonderful resource for teaching note reading and more.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I use the SMART board every day in my elementary music classroom. It has been a life saver. I organize my lessons using it. Each morning, all I have to do is pull up the grade level activity and everything I need for that lesson is up and ready to use. The SMART board also allows me to provide the students with interactive activities for practice and assessment purposes. For example, I can set it up with beats and rhythm choices for students to drag up the correct rhythms after hearing a rhythm pattern, or as a cloze rhythm practice within known songs. Or I can set up a relay game where students are to choose rhythm or melody motives from aural examples. The game is set up to reinforce when correct and not respond at all on incorrect responses.

Submitted by: Sara Yancey
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computer web-based grading
easier to compile grades and keep track

Submitted by: Brian Boecker
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A projector and a document camera! Easy to magnify a specific spot in the score and provide a visual while explaining a new concept.

Submitted by: Cherith Wells
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We have Harmony Directors in all band and orchestra classrooms, and the Roland Digital Pianos in all secondary choir programs.

Submitted by: Bill Watson
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I use Essential Elements 2000 CDs and Smart Music almost daily for the play along tracks. The kids feel like they are making music almost from day one with the accompaniment tracks. Plus Smart Music is able to assess them and record them. I put Smart Music up on my Promethean Board and everyone is able to follow along.

Submitted by: Julie Tyler
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Smart Music. It has. We still do private listening, but students come in more prepared.

Submitted by: Aaron Allison
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IPad app called iDoceo - AMAZING!!! Definitely for all the type A's out there.

Submitted by: Corey Fisher
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I use technology for instruction for assessment is limited.
We record their performance and allow them to personally evaluate what they have done using some predetermined criteria.

Submitted by: Timothy Kochen
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Bluetooth. Instead of hooking up a loudspeaker inside, we invested in a couple of inexpensive Bluetooth receivers on Amazon and pair our phones and computers to it for playback. This gives us mobile access to metronomes, drones, recordings, etc.

Submitted by: Eric Rokohl
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The school district has allowed limited access to the use of Youtube. It has greatly enhanced my instruction because I can use it as an immediate reference for songs or composers that we are currently studying. The students also love researching some of the songs on their own and reporting to me and the class what they find. It also gives me an opportunity to provide feedback and direction when students run into a version of a song that is not what they thought or may be deemed inappropriate for the school environment.

Submitted by: Donald Kearney
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Teacher ipad. I use it to take role, project information on the board. Record, tune, counting exercises. And right now I am using it answer these questions.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I am going to use the Smartboard this year, but haven't had any software in the past.

Submitted by: Terri Littlejohn
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I use a SmartBoard everyday for class. I teach K-6 and having the SmartBoard has given me the ability to get the attention of 90% plus because it is reaching them in away that keeps their attention.

Submitted by: Cary Vanarsdall
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Smartmusic is our everday tech solution. The visual and aural presentation of the music simultaneously, is in my opinion, the most significant breathrough in music education of our time.

Submitted by: James Keltner
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Ralph Vaughan Williams Rhosymedre 'Prelude on a Welsh Hymn Tune was a favorite of my students from several years ago. Due in large part to its beautifully weaving melodic content and the opportunities to play with expressiveness and intensity, this Prelude is a joy for the director to teach and for students, it helps them achieve new levels of musicality and musical happiness.

Submitted by: ddlonie@gmail.com
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What is your favorite music-related app, and why?
Submitted by: Anonymous, Answered in: September 2014
NotateMe Now - this traditional notation app is free (but has an option to upgrade), intelligently learns students' handwriting, and gives them the opportunity to practice creating/improvising/editing music. After they write their notes on the staff, the app "translates" their handwriting into a computer-generated note on the staff and plays it back for them. It's very engaging!

Submitted by: Sandra Divnick
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My favorite app is technically a non-music related application but it transfers incredibly well to our band classes. It's called 30/30 and it operates as a fully customizeable task list that is incredibly useful with classroom pacing. This application has been a great help for our campus in maximizing every single second of our classroom instruction.

Submitted by: Gary Williams
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Does Spotify count? ;-)

Submitted by: Kristi Savage
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I am a big fan of "DaTuner" app for my Android. This easy to use app makes a great tuner for every student. There is a 'Lite' version that is free. Since most of our students have smart phones, we are embracing the technology and utilizing it to the fullest. Our students place their phone on their stand for every rehearsal. It is making a huge difference in their awareness of natural pitch tendencies. With the ready availability of this app, I will never buy another tuner. There are similar apps for metronomes as well.

Submitted by: Douglas Morris
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Finale - best notation program available!

Submitted by: Linda Smith
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This is a hard question to answer because I use several different apps, depending on the class. However, Tonal Energy is an app I can use with my Beginner Band students and my High School Band students. For an app, it has one of the most accurate tuners (I've tested several), and the fact that it also has a metronome is a definite plus! Plus it has a tone generator, you can see an analysis of sound, you can record a student and play it back so they can hear and see their sounds, not to mention Mr. Smiley! I could go on and on....I love this app!

Submitted by: Stacy Clark
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Grooveshark or Pandora
I can find almost any song I want to listen to without having to make a purchase.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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iStrobosoft tuning app.
SilverDial Metronome app: Straight forward app. Subdivided simple to use
Virtuoso piano app: I use it for tuning Timpani. I have an Bluetooth earpiece so I can hear the tone.
TE Tuner app.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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The one we use the most is the Tonal Energy Tuner. We actually have our students purchase this app instead of purchasing a tuner. It is very versatile and user friendly! I also feel it shows students what "pitch center" really means in a very student friendly way!

Submitted by: Leigh Ann McClain
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Tonal energy, because it is easy to use and has tons of applications

Submitted by: Rene Rosas
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Sightreading Factory--instant sightreading lines in both clefs for any voice part, you can choose difficulty level, key signature, etc

Submitted by: Anonymous
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The app I find myself using every single day is RefelctorApp by Squirrel. Even though this app is not explicitly music related, it allows me to wirelessly project my iPad, iPhone, laptop, or other device using any projector hooked up to a computer. This means I can run Petersons' IStrobosoft tuner app on my iPad while walking around the room, and the kids can see it clearly projected on the board. This is a much cheaper alternative at $11 to other devices that do the same thing for upwards of $99.

Submitted by: Curtis Donohue
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I really enjoy using the Tonal Energy tuner for my own personal use and for instructional purposes. I like that the application has settings that range from "kid-friendly" to "professional". My students really enjoy using it because they receive immediate, clear feedback. I've found that they understand how to tune their instrument much more quickly when they get to practice it at home with this application. In addition to checking their intonation, students can analyze their tone and style and adjust accordingly. It just takes a few minutes of class instruction, and the students are set to use this application whether they are 12 or 17, in class or at home.

Submitted by: Tennille Johnson
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Tonal Energy

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Pandora -- able to use on many different devices, incl. Roku TV device

Submitted by: Bill Atkerson
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I use Cleartune almost every day. It's very practical and functions as well or better than a traditional tuner.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Tonal energy tuner/metronome for apple products
when student hits the correct pitch with good bow use, the app smiles. Tuner may be set for different temperments, instruments and sensitivity as well as generate tones.

Submitted by: Ann Victor
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Blob Chorus is my students' favorite! It is a great ear training game. Each blob sings a pitch, then the King Blob sings one. You select the blob that sang the same pitch as King Blob. If you guess wrong, the blob explodes! I use it with groups, and students hold up fingers for their answer. Great for that last five minutes or as a warmup activity.

Submitted by: Andrea Hutchison
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MetaXylo+ is a free Orff keyboard emulator. Students can choose metallophone or xylophone, and change the key of the instrument. They can also remove notes they don't need by double clicking the note name. There is an English version of the app with letter names, and a French version that uses fixed do (helpful only in the key of C).

Submitted by: Patrick Lollis
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Tonal Energy Tuner
It's fun for the students. Getting that :-) makes them happy. I also use it every day to record any session I had with the Young musician as well as everyone of my bands. It's essential to have such a device when teaching kids in a technological level of sophistication as we certainly living today

Submitted by: Jessie C Smith
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Coache's Eye and Tonal Energy (couldn't pick just one, sorry). Coach's Eye is fundamental during marching season, we use video from the football game and/or contest and we are able to slow it down, zoom in on lines or sections, mark freehand on the video, create lines or shapes. It helps us take "watching the performance video" from simply pointing out issues to really analyzing problems in real-time and slo-mo.
Tonal Energy is also a remarkable tool. There's too many features, and enough people are familiar that I won't go into all of that, but as a state-advancing concert ensemble who uses TE day in and day out, it has been a solid visual companion to our detailed sound concepts.

Submitted by: Ryan Kersey
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I really enjoy using the Toca Boca app, because it lets my students create music they want to hear. The characters that represent each instrument (voice, drums, keyboards, flute,etc.) are very colorful and creative! My special needs students, especially those with autism, are intrigued by this app and how they can create a voice or a choir!

Submitted by: Erika Warren
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Tonal Energy. Visual band learners can see their adjustments in a fun interactive way when tuning. Directors can also show articulations in the analysis section of the app.

Submitted by: Andy Thompson
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Peterson i-stobe tuner. Its great to show on a screen or tv for the students to see the tuning or easy to pass around for individuals on iPhone or iPad.

Submitted by: David Jasso
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MusicTeachersHelper.com It has become the center of my private studio business. Made for private music teachers for private music teachers. Wonderful Calendar, student records, expense records, mileage records, payments, invoices, appointments/lessons & more, and all integrated.

Submitted by: Kathy Aldridge
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I love the "Sing With The Best" app because even though it's geared towards singers, I can also use it with my string players. It is a tuner and it also measures the speed of your vibrato. I teach voice, piano and strings although I'm primarily a violinist and violist. When I'm training vibrato with intermediate level to advanced level students, I love to be able to show them what different speeds of vibrato look and sound like.

Submitted by: Nancy Householder
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Tonal energy app

Submitted by: Richard Sullivan
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I tunes & you tube

Submitted by: Bob Howard
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Remind 101 - not really music related, but an excellent way to distribute important information.

Submitted by: Tracy Collins
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Tonal Energy tuner for obvious reasons and forScore for the ease it allows me to carry many scores and to make notes on those scores

Submitted by: Sean Hill
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Practice Center - It allows my students to make videos of them either taking a playing test, passing off music and showing me how they practice. This app has a camera, metro. that can be used while they make the recording or a silent beat. It also has a timer on it, tuning drones that they can use to hear the relationships between intervals and their music.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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iBeat metronome (or any) has many applications, of course.
My current favorite is Google Translate. In addition to typing or hand-writing the word or phrase, I especially like the speaking application of it, so I can say the word or phrase to translate if I'm in a hurry. Best of all, one can hear a foreign word/phrase spoken in the language, so my students can also do a check on pronunciation for themselves!

Submitted by: Trebleshooter
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I love the TonalEnergy Tuner. Kids of all ages respond so well to the smilie face they get when in tune. I like the Analysis tab because you can see how consistent the sound is when holding a long tone.

Submitted by: Cathy Benford
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Tonal Energy - versatile

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I am a big fan of ForScore. This app allows me to import scores that our groups are working on (marching band music, pep music, concert literature, chamber music, etc). It is great that I don't have to carry around or look for those small scores. Additionally, I really like to project these scores while we are working on them. Students then have real world knowledge of what is going on and can synergize that with what they are hearing.

Submitted by: Jonathan Sweet
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Tonal Energy because it provides a means of assessing just intonation. It also has a host of other features including a metronome, the ability to transpose, and graph of students' note shapes.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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g string tuning app for android

Submitted by: Anonymous
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WRR101. It allows me to listen to well programmed classical music anywhere I have phone service.

Submitted by: Eddie Vandewalker
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Flashnote Derby! It is exciting and competitive but still offers a great review. I can also customize what information is being reviewed. Very handy!

Submitted by: Krista Lundquist
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I have recently found several decibel apps. They are very useful in showing students their various individual volume levels. Since students can also get these apps for themselves I believe this is a great tool. For the most part I find students play at two volume levels. LOUD ! and O.M.G. The app I'm currently working with is Db by sky pa

Submitted by: Patrick Authement
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I love tonal energy for use in my class. The students really enjoy trying to make the smile appear. I also use pitch lab when I am playing my instrument. My android phone has a better battery than my ipod and I can set it right next to my music even for a three or four hour gig.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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My favorite music app is definitely Tonal Energy Tuner app. I use it personally when I play outside of school as well as an educational source inside the classroom. We have used this app with iPads in the classroom and the students LOVE playing until the green smiley face comes up! It is also a great individual tool for students to use as it includes a metronome, tone generator and a recording function for later analysis. Talk about a well-rounded music app!

Submitted by: Katie Lewis
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My elementary students really enjoy Incredibox.com. It is a creative and fun interactive way to compose, using contemporary pop music components. There are are three different versions and within each version the students can choose from a variety of beats, special effects, melodies, choruses and voices. Whether you use it for analysis or just for fun, the kids ask for it over and over.

Submitted by: Sara Yancey
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NoteWorks is my favorite app for several reasons. They use all of the clefs including alto and tenor clef. You can expand or contract the range too. For students who are weak readers, I'll set the app settings for the child, hand just that student my IPad at the beginning of class and let them practice while I'm tuning the class. Kids can take a picture of their scores and we can discuss their strong and weak points at the end of the period. It also makes a great team activity if you project it on a screen.

Submitted by: Christina Marioneaux
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klty.com
I love the Christian music!

Submitted by: Brian Boecker
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Piano! No need to carry a pitch pipe, and handy for timing a guitar too!

Submitted by: Cherith Wells
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Amazon music. They have numerous selections of pieces useful for me to be so easily placed on my phone in one click.
itunes is another place where I can attain a wide selection of useful music.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Tonal Energy not only measures intonation, but also measures tone quality.

Submitted by: Bill Watson
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I haven't tried many apps because I have technological limitations on my campus. But the apps I've sampled, one of them is called Staff Wars (Star Wars), and that was very cool!

Submitted by: Anonymous
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My beginners love Tonal Energy; it's simple to use and they love to land the smiley face in the center. They think they have scored and I get kids that play in tune.

Submitted by: Julie Tyler
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Smart Music Listening App. I can listen to tests on the way home, on the way to school, at home at night and not worry about having to sit in front of a computer.

Submitted by: Aaron Allison
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I love the pro metronome class - I use it for click tracks with my church's praise band - you can save customized metronome speeds/styles.

Submitted by: Corey Fisher
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Garage Band - it is such a cool tool to use in the classroom. It is very user friendly with lots of great loops!

Submitted by: Susan Bartos
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Tenuto - This app is the musictheory.net website on the go. I have primarily used it in my private lessons and in a class setting to work ear training on intervals and scales as well as the note identification function with beginning students struggling to recognize and identify notes on the staff.

Submitted by: Terence Guerrero
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IrealB
I can find chord changes for tunes very easily.

Submitted by: Timothy Kochen
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It is a tie between Frozen Ape Tempo and Tempo Slow. I find both incredibly useful for personal and classroom use- Tempo is a fully-featured metronome that I can use during class, and create set lists for when I need to pre-set certain tempi. Tempo Slow I like to use with kids to slow down technical passages so they can have a better idea of what is actually going on, rather than just guessing because they just hear a blur.

Submitted by: Eric Rokohl
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Tonal Energy- it is all inclusive. It is a tuner, a metronome with subdivisions, a recorder, a tone generator, and you can use it to analyze what is going on in real time. I love it! And my kids love it when they get to see the smiley face, both on the app and me!

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Google Search because I can ask it to teach me how to do something and it finds something or someone to help me.

Submitted by: Terri Littlejohn
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I like the Play Along apps. With their apps you can download the instrument and play at easy, intermediate, or advanced. It shows the finger positions for the song and will wait until they play the right note before it moves them to the next one. I found it to be a great tool for new musicians in our 6th grade band.

Submitted by: Cary Vanarsdall
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"Panotuner" because it is a very simple tuner for all instruments, it is free, it does not take up a lot of memory, and it does not try to take over your phone.
"ChordFree" is my second favorite. (for jazz and guitar)

Submitted by: James Keltner
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What do you do to achieve balance between this time-demanding job and your home life?
Submitted by: Anonymous, Answered in: September 2014
This very subject is why so many young teachers burn out and leave the profession. It is an on going battle. The fact is, you DO NOT have to give up your life and live at your school to be successful. Although many do, it is a choice, not a necessity. I would suggest planning your home/family time first. Block off 1-2 evenings a week that you will not do school related work. Depending on what you teach and what grade levels, this may vary. For example a high school band director probably cannot block out Friday nights. Take all of Sunday away from school work. Refresh before the week begins. Then plan the remainder of your week around your personal time. Although it makes for a long day, try and plan extra rehearsals/sectionals on just a few days instead of everyday. Block out 1 afternoon during the week to get paperwork done and shut down your rehearsal room from students so you are not interrupted every five minutes. Most important remember you are only one person trying to take care of many. Ask your parents if someone is willing to come in once or twice a week to make copies, file music, type up a program, organize/issue uniforms, collect money. You will be surprised at how much this takes off your plate so you can focus on your first job... Teaching

Submitted by: Bryan Buffaloe
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Keep Jesus in it and have healthy boundaries. ;-)

Submitted by: Kristi Savage
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One of the most difficult things for music educators to do is say NO. There is always something we need to do at school, always someone asking for something else. We have to learn to say NO. Whatever you are working on will still be there tomorrow. My wonderful wife of 27 years has taught me how to see the differences between those things that must be done today and those that I want to get done today. When I am well-rested mentally and physically, I am better at my job. Putting in unnecessary hours is counterproductive. Prioritize.

Submitted by: Douglas Morris
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I am blessed to work with my husband at school. We try not to discuss school once we get home, but it doesn't always work. We both play our instruments regularly with civic and professional groups, and this helps.

Submitted by: Linda Smith
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I don't know that I've mastered this; every day is another learning experience for me with my students so I tweak as I teach. I try to keep work at work and I use my time wisely at school so when I go home, I'm home with my family.
God blessed me with my family and I love teaching, but I know that I'm going to be held accountable for my family time and not my job when I go to be with Him.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I go home and try to let what can be done tomorrow wait till tomorrow. I try not to bring work home. We schedule family time where we do something different each month.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Being a parent myself with children of my own in my band program has really helped me with balance! If your own children and family can't keep your band calendar and schedule.....there might be a problem! Hearing and seeing my own kids attitudes towards the program has really helped me build a more "family friendly" environment. Prior to motherhood. I used to spend 12 to 14 hours at the band hall daily. I can now get just as much accomplished in a much shorter time frame!
It's not about the time spent, but rather how you choose to spend your time!

Submitted by: Leigh Ann McClain
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I have not figured this out yet. Sometimes I just have to make myself go home! Having more online resources like charms, Google drive and Dropbox have allowed me to do more work at home than ever before.

Submitted by: Joshua Brosn
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We try to get everything done during the 'work' day thereby limiting after school rehearsal. The non-competition weekends are my time and I do nothing work related unless it is an emergency. Living in a small town, we try to get out of town once a month for a break.

Submitted by: Lee Brossette
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I divide my classes when the high school teacher is available, use every available minute in class, limit after school practices if possible but when I need them no later than 4:30, when it's time to go home I go home & leave work at work.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Home life suffers but wife is a principal so she is gone often as well

Submitted by: Anonymous
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As a private teacher, it impacts my home life, but not too much. I'm more in control than a public school teacher (which I used to be).

Submitted by: Bill Atkerson
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This isn't too hard for me, since I don't have children yet, but I make sure that when I am home with my husband I am truly present and paying attention. I try to make sure that the time we have together is quality time. I also try to maintain non-musical hobbies; I play roller derby a few hours a week, which is a great outlet for stress.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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It is extremely hard to balance home life and work life, especially when I love both so much! I make it a priority to get to school early to complete the work that I would otherwise have to do after school. I make lists of things to accomplish "today", "tomorrow", or "soon" so that I know what has to get done today and what can wait. I also make it a point to leave at the same time every day whether I am "finished" or not. It's hard to leave things undone, but my family is worth it!

Submitted by: JenniferYoung
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Planning is key! Put family time on your calendar and give it the same priority as school commitments. It's okay to tell someone, "I can't, I have another commitment." Your students and parents will respect and appreciate your dedication to your family.

Submitted by: Andrea Hutchison
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I have an incredibly supportive husband who can take on more at home when I have more to do at school like trips or events. During my first year of teaching I stayed at work until 6:30 or even 7:30 most nights. After that I decided that I would leave work by 5:00 or 5:30 at the latest. I had to remind myself that not everything has to be done that day. Most of the time it can wait until tomorrow. I still don't know what I was doing that took up so much time that first year.

Submitted by: Amanda Ransom
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Nowhere on my teaching certificate in the state of Texas does it say how many hours I must work. It says lifetime. Lifetime? A lifetime of teaching requires a lifetime of passion but I think the two intermix, they become one your work becomes your lifestyle your lifestyle becomes work. To separate the two would be dangerous, that's why they call it a vacation. Unfortunately even us musicians, with strong passions and desires, to exceed those predecessors before us with the ultimate respect would never ever stop our passion. For without our passion where is the hope?

Submitted by: Mr Jessie C Smith
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As a young teacher who is still single, I feel the time crunch less than most, but I've found that keeping myself ULTRA-ORGANIZED has been a solid factor in cutting down time to complete the house-keeping items. I haven't been successful keeping a written to-do list, but I have found new success keeping In/Out boxes labeled "today", "this week", "next week", and "later". The today box is stacked on top and I know I need to clear it out by the end of the day. The rest helps me keep an organized timeline without it simply turning into a big to-do pile without a context for completion.
I try to do as much as possible when I sit down at my desk.

Submitted by: RK
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I make sure that when I come home to my wife and children that I do not bri any work home with me. In situations that involve late night football games or competitions, I'm always looking to get them involved somehow with the group. Honestly, I have recently learned to take more time away from my job when my family needs me (doctor appointments, etc). As much as I don't want to be away from my students, my family is important to me as they are my biggest supporters.

Submitted by: Charles 'CZ' Stollon
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I actually walk with my family in the evenings (when I have the time), but I also work out and dance at home! I teach during the summer (tap and music), so if I had a bad day at work, I can come home and put on my tap shoes and dance a bad day away. I also pray every morning before I get ready for work. When I pray, it seems to start my day off right. I know if something isn't working in my favor, I just pray and know God has my back. I also am very blessed to teach in the private sector, so even though I have challenges, I love what I am doing! I am my own boss, so if I am having problems with a student, I talk to the parent directly. I make time for my husband (we schedule date night once a week) and I always make sure to listen to my son every day. I know if something isn't right at school with my son, I email his teacher to see what happened at school. Clear communication at home and at school is what I always try to strive for in my daily life.

Submitted by: Erika Warren
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Spend time with family. Watch TV

Submitted by: Andy Thompson
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Leave work at work and when I'm home, I'm home, no exceptions.

Submitted by: David Jasso
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It's a matter of prioritizing. Currently, I am a widow and have no children at home which, of course, eases some responsibilities. Previously, it was using proper and appropriate scheduling.

Submitted by: Kathy Aldridge
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Balance is a word that's different to to every individual. My personal life differs than the "norm" . I am a military spouse. I must often explain to my students and parents that I sometimes have time constraints that are beyond my control so I am only available during set times but they are welcome to email me or text me if they have an emergency. My students may also email me if they get stuck while practicing. They also keep practice journals which help greatly.

Submitted by: Nancy Householder
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I offer my thoughts on the subject even though I cannot boast of any mastery in this area. Anything of quality requires time and effort. No one can achieve excellence at the office without putting in the hours and sweat. If the family is more important than the job, then it stands to reason that our exertion at home must be greater than it is at work. I doubt any of us who expect a high standard in our occupation could honestly say that our rigor at work equals our energy at home . We must try harder. If we really think about it, it is not about balance. Our loved ones should tip the scale to a point of imbalance in their favor. So what is the solution? We need to go home at a decent hour. We need to talk to our spouses like they are the most important people in our lives. Our children need to know they are our favorite kids.

Submitted by: Sean Pullen
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There is no perfect answer. Try to be efficient at your job and use your time wisely, but if you are "married" to your work, there will be problems. If something needs to give way, it should be your job yielding to your family. After heart bypass surgery five years ago, my priorities got quickly adjusted for me. We often define ourselves by our work, but your job is not ever as important as your family. I also learned to let job stress roll off me more so as not to bring it home to my family.

Submitted by: Bob Dierdorf
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I work hard, spend many hours at work, but, when I go home, I leave the job at school. It takes a long time to learn to do that, but, it works for me.

Submitted by: Richard Sullivan
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Leave school at school. Time at home is about family.

Submitted by: Bob Howard
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I honestly believe that my choirs could be better if I neglected my family and spent more time in extra rehearsal, planning etc.... But!! It is also very important that my students see my devotion to my family. After all, in the long run, most of them need a lot more instruction in how to keep a family stable than they do how to build a mega choir program. But, using the time given wisely is so important. We rehearse when we should be rehearsing, we don't take days off, we sing during my lunch, we sing during their study halls..... I look for anytime during the day to pull students in for extra rehearsal.

Submitted by: Tracy Collins
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I do not conduct after school rehearsals nor do I at this point have evening concerts. Everything. Takes place during the school day, including concerts. We have concerts during morning break, or during lunch, so parents can come watch during their lunch break.

Submitted by: Katie James
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I find this to be the single greatest concern of my life presently. We create sometimes our own monsters in what we develop our programs to become. I believe that each year you do not have to "top the previous year." You will receive pressure from parents, students, administration and yourself to do so. You have to take the time in the summer to evaluate what you want to accomplish this year, how much time to dedicate to each project and then try to stay within those guidelines. I also believe I don't use as much of the resources around me to help whether that is other directors, teachers, parents and students.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Without an assistant to divide the workload, my job is a busy one. My main strategy for balance between work and home is setting time boundaries : I leave school at a pre-set time almost every day. Everything school-related must be completed by that time or it's left for the next day. During weekdays, I do school work only at school.
When students need a tutorial, they must request it 24 hours in advanc, and have a ride ready 1 hour after the lesson begins. If possible, the tutorial is scheduled before school or 5 minutes after the last class of the day. If the student shows up late for the lesson without a valid excuse, the lesson still ends at the designated time.The time between the end of the school day and late band events is also spent working on school-related tasks (including tutorials), which frees up personal time during the week and weekends.
I keep a running to-do list on my phone, every morning flagging the most important items as the day’s tasks. If all of the flagged items are completed, I continue working on other tasks until it’s time to leave.

Submitted by: Stephanie Wlodkowski
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I refuse to put winning over my home life. Teaching my students how to be musicians is my work priority, everything else will take care of itself. I am blessed to have a job with numerous days off, so that is where the home life balance comes in to play.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Summer vacation.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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For many years my wife told me to "find a hobby." I thought my hobbies were score study, writing marching band drill, working on band budgets, scheduling rehearsals, etc. I found myself getting burned out fast. I quickly found some hobbies that allow me to decompress from the stresses of each day's work. My wife finds me to be happier and I have found myself (at times) less stressed out. When we don't leave time for ourselves and allow our career to consume who we are, we can no longer define ourselves by who we are, but instead define ourselves as what we do. This is the quickest way to burn out.

Submitted by: Jonathan Sweet
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when it's time to go home. I punch out and go home.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I would go to work at 6:45 AM and do sectionals and stay until 5:30 PM for the afternoon sectionals. I would then go home and work with my children on homework or play soccer or basketball until it go dark. My wife (also a teacher) would cook dinner and we would all sit down together each evening. When our children got older we would divide our time taking them to extracurricular activities.

Submitted by: Randy Bloodworth
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First, if married and/or have children, you must make what time you have with them very special. You must have a spouse or partner that understand the demands you have at work. Try to keep your priorities in the correct order, God, family, and job. Everything else will fall in place.

Submitted by: Nelson Nolden
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A great idea I got form a parent was to leave your cell phone by the door when you get home. It really helps!!

Submitted by: Christian Holzer
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I make time for other interests; family, exercise, cooking, gardening.
But mostly I just work late... haha

Submitted by: Krista Lundquist
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I have a three year old that has to be picked up before 6:00 pm. At 5:30 my phone alarm goes off, I shut off my computer and leave the office for the night. Before my daughter, I had no balance and my wife was a band widow.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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This is the most difficult part for me. My husband and I are both band directors and have an 18 month old son, so we struggle with the time management constantly. We work hard at school so that when we come home, we don't have to focus on the job and can focus on our son and on each other. It's important to work smart and diligently throughout the day so that you can have focused family time at home. It also helps that our son loves band concerts and socials, as he attends a ton during the year! Having a supportive family makes all the difference in having a great work life too. We always say, we're a Band Family for life!

Submitted by: Katie Lewis
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pray

Submitted by: Brian Boecker
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My husband and kids come along on just about every field trip, my children hang out at my school alot and luckily my students are great with them! (I also hope that this will foster in them a love of choral music and performance!!) But I've also learned to say NO more, and cut events/fundraisers that are not so productive, even though they may be tradition.

Submitted by: Cherith Wells
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I pray constantly for guidance, wisdom, patience, and discernment. I "check in" with my husband frequently through dialogue to make sure we are still on the same page. I am in a lucky spot where all of my family are involved in music whether it be in our musicals, or at church, or just singing at the dinner table together.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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I actually plan out both work time and leisure time on my iPhone and stick to it.

Submitted by: Bill Watson
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I try to work smarter, not harder. I leave work at work. The most I'll usually do at home is check work e-mails.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Pray. Seriously, I spend time with my Lord in prayer and in His Word everyday. I leave my job at my job site and I go home to be with my family. My husband is the love of my life and my daughter is my pride and joy. I work 100% for my kids when I'm at the Band Hall and there's nothing I wouldn't do for them, but I'm a Christian, a wife, and a mother before I'm a band director.

Submitted by: Julie Tyler
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A very understanding wife. I try to get as much as I need to get done at school then so all of my research, planning and paper work after my family has gone to bed for the night.

Submitted by: Aaron Allison
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I try to include my family in all my school activities. Because my children are grown I just have to make sure that I spend QUALITY Time with my husband and my 90 year old mother.

Submitted by: Ida Steadman
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Not succeeding very well right now - spend a lot of evenings at school. Try to get as much done as I can during planning and lunch so that my weekends and evenings are completely free.

Submitted by: Corey Fisher
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I work very hard to not take my work home with me.

Submitted by: Susan Bartos
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I have a cut-off time everyday no matter if I am finished or not. Also my school email is not linked to any of my mobile devices so when I lock the door of my classroom my work-life stays there until I return the next day.

Submitted by: Terence Guerrero
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You have to have boundaries. That means knowing how to say no and setting limits with students, colleagues and administration.
Good time management skills are a must. If you are hanging out at the school talking to other instructors that doesn't count as work.

Submitted by: Timothy Kochen
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During the school year, I set an alarm on my phone for end-of-day. In my teaching assignment - 3:30. This keeps me from mindlessly working past the set school day time. I may stay late, but at least I am more mindful of my time and how much I'm staying 'late".

Submitted by: Anonymous
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Keep work at work. When I come home, I am not checking school email (I have the ability to check it on my phone but it won't tell me unless I open the app), taking school calls, doing score study (although during contest season, sometimes), or anything of the sort. I give my wife and daughter 100% of my attention when I am not at school. It also helps that I married a band gal, and she understands the time commitments of my job. We still go on a date once a week- that time is sacred. We talk about us, not about band or our daughter (well, sometimes we talk about our daughter!).
Not only that, but understanding that there are tasks that CAN wait until tomorrow, or next week. I don't have to get everything done today. At the end of the day, when rehearsals are done, if there isn't an emergency, we are out the door.

Submitted by: Eric Rokohl
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My husband and children love me, and remind me of that often. I turn my phone off on Sundays, that is my family day. I also don't just hang around at work. If I am caught up with what needs to be done I don't stay at the Bandhall and make up more things to do. I go home.

Submitted by: Anonymous
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During the school year, I don't really have a lot of time to be home.

Submitted by: Terri Littlejohn
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I have a great curriculum called Quaver that takes care of most of the planning stages of the job, and as a rule I will only stay and extra 30min after school lets out, unless I am working on one of our school programs.

Submitted by: Cary Vanarsdall
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Go home at a set time. If it isn't done by that time it can wait until tomorrow. If it can't wait maybe it should be eliminated from your schedule. We are our own worst enemies in that regard. We schedule ourselves into a bind and then wonder why we can't get it all done.

Submitted by: James Keltner
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